Loading

NEWS DETAILS

Dobkowski Guest Lecturers

Posted on Friday, November 30, 2012

Professor of Religious Studies Michael Dobkowski was recently the guest lecturer for Sacred Heart University's annual Lachowicz Lecture. Dobkowski discussed Polish rescue behavior in the context of the complex Polish-Jewish history and relationship.

According to an article about the talk that appeared on NewsBlaze.com, "Speaking to a full house of students, faculty, staff and community members, Dobkowski discussed the complexity of Polish-Jewish relations during the Holocaust. He began with a story that came from a gathering of survivors from the Warsaw Ghetto about a man who had been saving a piece of bread all day for his dinner. Just as he was about to eat the meal he had been dreaming of all day, a child came to his window crying out for bread in Yiddish. Since it was after curfew, he threw the piece of bread down to the child only to see the child fall to the ground and die.

"Fifty years later, the man was still bothered by the incident. His friends suggested that he did not do enough - that he should have gone downstairs and outside to hand the bread to the boy. That way, the child would have known someone cared during the last minutes of his life."

Dobkowski is quoted, "We are dealing with a time in history when sometimes people threw the bread and sometimes they didn't. It's a time in history when many people felt fear and isolation."

A member of the faculty since 1976, Dobkowski is an expert on genocide, terrorism and the Holocaust. He holds bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees from New York University. A prolific writer, he has written "The Tarnished Dream: The Basis of American Anti-Semitism," "The Politics of Indifference: Documentary History of Holocaust Victims in America," "Jewish American Voluntary Organizations" and co-authored "Nuclear Weapons, Nuclear States & Terrorism" and "On the Edge of Scarcity." He has co-written other volumes on the Holocaust and genocide, and also co-wrote "The Nuclear Predicament: Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century."

During the fall of 2011, Dobkowski served as a visiting professor at Nazareth College, where he taught Jewish thought, the history and implications of the Holocaust, the American Jewish experience, and the history of anti-Semitism.

He has participated five times in the Goldner Holocaust Symposium at Wroxton College in England, most recently in 2010; and was a fellow at the Institute for the Teaching of the Post-Biblical Foundations of Western Civilization at the Jewish Theological Seminary. He received the New York University Ferdinand Czernin Prize in History and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

The full article about his talk follows.


NewsBlaze.com
Michael Dobkowski: Complexity of Polish-Jewish Relations During The Holocaust
November 20, 2012

Michael Dobkowski, professor of Religious Studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, was the guest lecturer for Sacred Heart University's annual Lachowicz Lecture. His topic was Polish rescue behavior in the context of the complex Polish-Jewish history and relationship.

Speaking to a full house of students, faculty, staff and community members, Dobkowski discussed the complexity of Polish-Jewish relations during the Holocaust. He began with a story that came from a gathering of survivors from the Warsaw Ghetto about a man who had been saving a piece of bread all day for his dinner. Just as he was about to eat the meal he had been dreaming of all day, a child came to his window crying out for bread in Yiddish. Since it was after curfew, he threw the piece of bread down to the child only to see the child fall to the ground and die.

Fifty years later, the man was still bothered by the incident. His friends suggested that he did not do enough - that he should have gone downstairs and outside to hand the bread to the boy. That way, the child would have known someone cared during the last minutes of his life.

"We are dealing with a time in history when sometimes people threw the bread and sometimes they didn't. It's a time in history when many people felt fear and isolation," Dobkowski said.

He noted that genocide requires both perpetrators and collaborators. In many cases, he said, the most ordinary people were merely trying to survive and were not thinking of heroic measures. But there were also perpetrators, colluders and the actively indifferent. "That's why those who did rescue others - or did even smaller things to make a difference - are viewed as heroes," he said. "They are the bright spots of World War II. They are powerful examples of light and caring. Many of the tens of thousands who survived did so because they were helped by non-Jews."

Dobkowski said that Poland is particularly important in the history of the Holocaust because there were more Polish rescuers than anywhere else, but there were also more Polish victims. There were six major killing camps in Poland, but there were tens of thousands who extended themselves to help their Jewish friends and neighbors. "They had to be afraid for themselves and their families. They had to be afraid that their neighbors would turn them in," he said.

The reality is that in retrospect, Jews who could get to the other side of Warsaw and find a family to help them survived much better than those who participated in the resistance. This fact and others have led to two competing narratives of what happened between the Poles and Jew during World War II, Dobkowski said.
One narrative speaks to the altruistic and heroic behavior that led to tens of thousands of people being saved. That narrative says that Poland was not an anti-Semitic country, but rather a country victimized by Germany. "No other nation was targeted and decapitated by the Germans the way Poland was. Three million Polish Christians were killed during World War II and, while the killing camps were constructed in Germany, there were no Polish guards at the camps," Dobkowski noted.

The other narrative points to the hundreds of thousands of Jews who were turned over to the Nazis - a narrative that views Poland as a Jewish cemetery. "Some suggest that the abuse visited on the Jews by the Poles was worse than by the Germans. There are many survivors who not only would never return to Poland, but don't think others should be there doing business and building synagogues. It's complicated," Dobkowski said.

His point was validated during the question and answer session following his presentation. Members of the audience spoke passionately from each of the conflicting viewpoints. As Dobkowski said, it's complicated.

The lecture is sponsored by the University's Polish Studies Fund and the Human Journey Common Core Colloquia Series. The Polish Studies Fund is a long-standing endowment established by the late Professor Francis Lachowicz to promote the study of Polish history, culture and language. Professor Lachowicz taught at SHU from 1978 to 1995 in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages.


About Sacred Heart University
Sacred Heart University, the second-largest independent Catholic university in New England, offers more than 50 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs on its main campus in Fairfield, Connecticut, and satellites in Connecticut, Luxembourg and Ireland. More than 6,000 students attend the University's five colleges: Arts & Sciences; Health Professions; University College; the AACSB-accredited John F. (Jack) Welch College of Business; and the NCATE-accredited Isabelle Farrington College of Education. The Princeton Review includes SHU in its guides "Best 377 Colleges - 2013 Edition," "Best in the Northeast" and "Best 294 Business Schools - 2012 Edition." *U.S. News & World Report* ranks SHU among the best master's universities in the North in its annual "America's Best Colleges" publication. Sacred Heart was also mentioned in *Money* magazine's ranking of Fairfield as the 64th best town to live. As one of just 23 institutions nationally, SHU is a member of the Association of American Colleges & Universities' (AAC&U) Core Commitments Leadership Consortium, in recognition of its core, "The Human Journey." SHU fields 31 division I athletic teams, and has an award-winning program of community service. www.sacredheart.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 


Print This Article | Email This Article

RESOURCES

Save and Share Article

To send feedback or make a suggestion for a future article, contact publicity@hws.edu.