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2012-2014 CATALOGUE

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2012-2014 COURSE CATALOGUE : PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology provides students with a broad introduction to the study of behavior and its underlying processes with emphasis on psychology as an experimental science. The Department of Psychology offers a disciplinary major and minor. To count toward the major or minor, courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better. In order for courses to count toward the psychology major or minor, the following prerequisites must be met: 200-level courses require PSY 100 as a prerequisite; 300-level non-lab courses require PSY 100 and at least one 200-level course, which might be specified; 300-level lab courses require PSY 100, PSY 210, and at least one other 200-level course, which might be specified. Refer to individual course descriptions for specific 200-level prerequisites.

The department recommends strongly for students planning to major or minor in psychology to take PSY 100 as soon as possible and then PSY 210. Furthermore, the department recommends strongly that PSY 210 be either completed (with a grade of C- or higher), or in progress (with student in good standing), before students declare the psychology major (before the end of their sophomore year), or before they declare their psychology minor (Junior year). In addition, after taking PSY 100, students interested in majoring or minoring in psychology should take only one 200-level elective course before enrolling in PSY 210. These recommendations are intended to support student success in choosing and completing psychology as a major/minor. All students are encouraged to work closely with their advisor to meet the Psychology Department’s recommendations.

Students are eligible to receive academic credit toward their psychology major for a maximum of two courses taken at institutions elsewhere. Students pursuing the psychology minor may transfer a maximum of one course toward their psychology minor. A grade of C- or higher must be earned for all transfer courses. No online courses are eligible for transfer credit. Students planning to transfer courses from another institution while they are students of Hobart and William Smith Colleges must consult with and secure approval from the Psychology Department chair prior to enrolling in a course. For those transfer students who had previously matriculated at another institution prior to their attendance at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, the number of transfer courses accepted toward the major or minor is negotiable. In such cases, the Psychology Department chair determines which courses can count toward the HWS psychology major or minor.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (B.A.)
disciplinary, 11 courses
PSY 100 or PSY 101 and PSY 210; one course from laboratory group A; one course from laboratory group B; two 300-level non-lab courses; four additional psychology courses, only one of which may be at the 400-level, one of which must be the prerequisite for a 300-level group A lab course, and one of which must be the prerequisite for the 300-level group B lab course; and one course from outside the department that provides another perspective on behavior. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the major.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR (B.S.)
disciplinary, 16 courses
All of the requirements for the B.A. in psychology, plus five additional courses in the natural sciences, approved by the adviser, assuming the course that provides a perspective on behavior from a discipline other than psychology is in the natural sciences. Otherwise, six additional natural science courses are needed.All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the major.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
disciplinary, 6 courses
PSY 100 and PSY 210; one psychology laboratory course (either group); and three additional elective psychology courses, only one of which may be at the 400-level. One of the electives must be a prerequisite for either a group A or B laboratory course. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the minor.

200-LEVEL ELECTIVE COURSES
PSY 203 Introduction to Child Psychology
PSY 205 Adolescent Psychology
PSY 220 Introduction to Personality Psychology
PSY 221 Introduction to Psychopathology
PSY 227 Introduction to Social Psychology
PSY 230 Biopsychology
PSY 231 Cognitive Psychology
PSY 235 Cognitive Neuroscience
PSY 245 Introduction to Cross-Cultural Psychology
PSY 299 Sensation and Perception
WMST 223 Social Psychology
WMST 247 Psychology of Women

300-LEVEL LABORATORY COURSE GROUPS
Group A
PSY 310 Research in Perception and Sensory Processes
PSY 311 Research in Behavioral Neuroscience
PSY 331 Research in Cognition

Group B
PSY 321 Research in Developmental Psychology
PSY 322 Research in Personality Psychology
PSY 327 Research in Experimental Social Psychology
PSY 347 Research in Cross-Cultural Psychology
PSY 350 Research in Clinical Psychology
WMST 323 Research in Social Psychology

300-LEVEL NON-LABORATORY COURSES
PSY 307 History and Systems of Psychology
PSY 309 Topics in Sensory Perception
PSY 344 Topics in Personality Psychology
PSY 346 Topics in Cross-Cultural Psychology
PSY 352 Topics in Clinical Psychology
PSY 359 Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience
PSY 370 Topics in Developmental Psychology
PSY 373 Topics in Social Psychology
PSY 375 Topics in Cognitive Psychology
WMST 357 Self in American Culture
WMST 372 Topics in Social Psychology

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
100 Introduction to Psychology This course offers a comprehensive survey of the methodology and content of present day psychology. Emphasis is placed on the development of a critical evaluative approach to theories and empirical data. (Fall and Spring, offered annually)

203 Introduction to Child Psychology This course provides an overview of theories and research methodologies in child development. The focus is on normative development, including the progression of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional changes that take place from conception through late childhood. Emphasis is placed on contextual influences on development, such as parenting, family environments, peer relationships, the media, and schools. The development of identity and self-esteem, moral development, and gender roles are also discussed. Students can take either PSY 203 or PSY 205 (not both), and exceptions can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Kingery and staff, offered at least alternating years)

205 Adolescent Psychology This course examines the developmental processes and social forces that contribute to adolescence as a distinct part of the life span. Emphasis is placed on major theories, research findings, and the biological, cognitive, and social changes that occur during adolescence. This course also focuses on contextual influences (i.e., the family, peers, schools, neighborhoods, the media) on development and issues such as intimacy, identity, sexuality, autonomy, and psychological problems (e.g., eating disorders, depression, antisocial behavior). Students can take either PSY 203 or PSY 205 (not both), and exceptions can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Kingery and staff, offered at least alternating years)

210 Statistics and Research Methods A survey of basic procedures for the analysis of psychological data, topics in this course include basic univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, and a variety of analyses to use with single group, between group, within group, and factorial designs. A study of experimental methods is also conducted with laboratory. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Rizzella, Greenspon, offered each semester)

220 Introduction to Personality Major theoretical approaches and contemporary research are evaluated to assess the current state of knowledge about intrapsychic, dispositional, biological, cognitive, and sociocultural domains of personality functioning. The personal, historical, and cultural contexts of theory development are emphasized. Application of personality concepts to individual lives is encouraged to enhance understanding of self and others. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Dyrenforth, offered annually)

221 Introduction to Psychopathology This course primarily focuses on the theoretical models, diagnosis and assessment of adult psychological disorders. Childhood disorders, relevant controversies and prevention are also covered, time permitting. Typical readings assigned beyond the primary text include case studies and autobiographical accounts of mental illness. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Bodenlos, offered annually)

222 Developmental Psychopathology This course focuses on developmental psychopathology, an approach that aims to better understand psychological disorders by identifying factors that put individuals at risk for developing psychological disorders, as well as the protective factors that contribute to positive adjustment. We will discuss key concepts in developmental psychopathology, including risk, resilience, and developmental pathways. This course will also emphasize the contexts that influence both adaptive and maladaptive development, such as families, neighborhoods, and peer interactions. Throughout the semester, we will focus on specific psychological disorders ( e.g., autism, oppositional defiant disorder, ADHD, anxiety, depression ) that emerge from infancy through adolescence, discussing the risk/protective factors, course, diagnostic criteria, and evidence-based treatment strategies for each disorder. This course will involve lecture, discussion, debates, case examples, other-in -class activities, and video clips.

227 Introduction to Social Psychology This course introduces students to theory and research in social psychology, the study of the nature and causes of individual and group behavior in social contexts. Emphases are placed on understanding social psychological theories through studying classic and current research and on applying social psychological theories to better understand phenomena such as person perception, attitude change, prejudice and discrimination, interpersonal attraction, romantic relationships, conformity, aggression, and intergroup relations. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Fisher, offered annually)

230 Biopsychology This course examines how the human nervous system is related to behavior. Lectures are designed to concentrate on aspects of biopsychology that are interesting and important to a broad audience. The intent is to make connections among several areas of specialization within psychology (e.g., developmental; cognitive; and clinical) and between other disciplines (e.g., philosophy; biology; chemistry). A format is employed that presents basic content to support the presentation of contemporary topics.  Information is presented assuming knowledge from an Introductory level Psychology course. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Greenspon, offered annually)

231 Cognitive Psychology This course is designed to provide a general understanding of the principles of cognitive psychology. Cognitive psychology is the scientific approach to understanding the human mind and its relationship to behavior. The course introduces students to classic and contemporary empirical research in both theoretical and practical aspects of a variety of cognitive issues. Topics included are pattern recognition, attention, mental representation, memory, language, problem solving and decision-making. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Rizzella, offered annually)

235 Cognitive Neuroscience Cognitive Neuroscience is the interdisciplinary study of neural structures and their relationship to behavioral functions. Cognitive neuroscience attempt to bridge cognitive theory with theories of neural function and organization.  In this course, we will seek to identify neural mechaninisms that give rise to cognitive processes such as attention, emotion, language and memory. We will cover basic neuroanatomy and investigative methods used to make inferences on the relationship between brain function and cognitive processing. Topics include : Cognitive Control, Visual Recognition, Language Acquisition, Language Deficits, Memory, Emotions, Memory Disorders and Attentional Awareness Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Offered occasionally)

243 Organizational Psychology This course provides an introduction to organizational theory and behavior. Issues relating to effectiveness, communication, and motivation within organizations are considered from the point of view of the individual. Some selected topics include leadership, management-employee relations, the impact of technology and the environment on organizations, and organizational survival and change. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Offered occasionally)

245 Introduction to Cross-Cultural Psychology Cross-cultural psychology is the systematic, comparative study of human behavior in different sociocultural contexts. This course examines theory and research that pertain to cross cultural similarities and differences in human experience and functioning. The cultural antecedents of behavior are emphasized. Course readings focus on the diversity of human experience in domains such as cognition and intelligence, emotion and motivation, socialization and development, social perception and interaction, and mental health and disorder. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Ashdown, offered annually)

299 Sensation and Perception Perception of the world through the senses is one of the most sophisticated yet least appreciated accomplishments of the human brain. This course explores how people experience and understand the world through the senses, using frequent classroom demonstrations of the perceptual phenomena under discussion. The course introduces the major facts and theories of sensory function and examines the psychological processes involved in interpreting sensory input, as well as the evolutionary foundations of human perception. The primary emphasis is on vision, though other senses are considered as well. Prerequisite: PSY 100. (Graham, offered annually)

307 History and Systems of Psychology This course examines the history of psychology and its antecedents, both classical and modern. Surveyed in detail are the processes by which the diverse roots of modern psychology fostered the development of principal areas of psychological inquiry, including those that guide much of the research and practice of psychology today. This course places into historical perspective major concepts, philosophical assumptions and theories of psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and two PSY courses other than PSY 210. (Offered occasionally)

309 Topics in Sensory Perception This course provides an in-depth exploration of a specific topic in sensory perception using advanced readings from the primary literature. The topics covered vary from semester to semester but might include study of a particular sensory system (e.g., hearing or touch), study of a particular sensory ability (e.g., color vision), or study of a particular issue in perception (e.g., perceptual development or brain mechanisms of perception). Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 299 or permission of the instructor. (Graham, offered occasionally)

310 Research in Perception and Sensory Processes In this introduction to conducting research on the senses (with laboratory), students explore contemporary issues in sensation and perception through classroom discussion and hands-on research experience. Working closely with the instructor, students develop, conduct, analyze, and present research projects on specific topics in the field. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210 and PSY 299. (Graham, offered annually)

311 Research in Behavioral Neuroscience This course exposes students to basic concepts of psychological research in the area of neuroscience. A systems approach is utilized that assumes the organized activity of different parts of the nervous system is important for determining behavior. Currently, the focus of research in this course involves investigating how music is organized in the nervous system and how this impacts other behaviors such as language and other cognitive abilities. Emphasis is placed on theoretical and methodological issues. Specifically, the history of questions to which theory and method have been applied, the logic implicit to answer certain kinds of questions, and the strengths and limitations of specific answers for providing insights into the nature of the brain-behavior relationship are examined. The development of conceptual and theoretical skills is emphasized. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210 and PSY 230 or PSY 299, or permission of instructor. (Greenspon, offered annually)

321 Research in Developmental Psychology This course provides an overview of the research designs and methods used by developmental psychologists. Attention is given to ethical issues involved in human research, critical evaluation of published developmental research, and interpretation of research findings. Students gain direct experience with research methods such as questionnaires, parent and/or child interviews, behavioral observations, and other laboratory tasks that assess children’s development. Research is conducted in both lab and community settings. Students design and conduct a research study or develop their own research proposal during this course. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210, and PSY 203 or PSY 205. (Kingery, offered annually)

322 Research in Personality Psychology This course provides an introduction to a variety of methods employed in the service of three complementary objectives of personality research: 1) holistic understanding of the unique organization of processes within individuals, 2) explanation of individual differences and similarities, and 3) discovery of universal principles that characterize human personality functioning. Practical, ethical, and theoretical considerations for assessing and studying personality characteristics and processes are emphasized, as are interpretation and critical analysis of published research. Students design, carry out, and report original research. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210 and PSY 220. (Dyrenforth, offered annually)

327 Research in Social Psychology This course is designed to acquaint students with experimental research approaches in social psychology. Through examination of classic and contemporary studies and innovative as well as traditional methods in the discipline, the practical and ethical challenges of designing, conducting, and interpreting social psychological research are explored. Students design and carry out original research. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210 and PSY 227 or WMST 223. (Fisher, offered annually)

331 Research in Cognition An in-depth examination of experimental methodology in the field of cognitive psychology is covered in this course. The use of reaction time and accuracy measures is emphasized. Students conduct a study in a cognitive area of their choice and present it during a classroom poster session. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210 and PSY 231. (Rizzella, offered annually)

344 Topics in Personality This course explores classic and current theory and research pertaining to fundamental and often controversial issues in personality psychology. The course follows a seminar format that emphasizes critical analysis and articulation of ideas, both in discussion and in writing. Topics are announced in advance. Possible topics include personality and culture; personality development; self and identity; personality and interpersonal relationships, ethnic identity, personality and emotion. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 220, or permission of instructor. (Dyrenforth, offered annually)

346 Topics in Cross-Cultural Psychology This course provides an in-depth examination of a contemporary topic in cross-cultural psychology. Topics may include: culture and cognition; cultural contexts of emotional experience; culture and communication; culture, mental health, and psychopathology; social perception across cultures; cultural influences on social behavior; diversity and intercultural training; prejudice and discrimination; or ethnic identity. Course activities draw upon extensive readings in the primary literature of the selected topic. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 245. (Ashdown, offered annually)

347 Research in Cross-Cultural Psychology This course concentrates on the study of human behavior and experience as they occur in different cultural contexts and/or are influenced by cultural factors. Special attention is devoted to cross-cultural research methodology. Claims about the generality or universality of psychological laws and theories are evaluated. Students use knowledge gained in this course to design and carry out a research project. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210, and PSY 245. (Ashdown, offered annually)

350 Research in Clinical Psychology This course provides an introduction to the scientist-practitioner model of clinical psychology. Students examine a variety of theoretical models of psychotherapy and research regarding the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Contemporary treatment issues and ethics are also considered. Students are introduced to clinical research methods and design a research proposal in an area of clinical psychology. The laboratory component provides an opportunity for students to develop research skills by developing and carrying out a research study. Prerequisites: PSY 100, PSY 210 and PSY 221. (Bodenlos, offered annually)

352 Topics in Clinical Psychology This course provides an in-depth analysis into specific topics in health psychology and behavioral medicine. These topics are reviewed from a clinical perspective, including the review of evidence-based treatments and clinical case studies. Topics that may be explored in-depth in this course include stress and illness, stress reduction techniques, substance use disorders and treatment, obesity, physical activity, HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular disease, and emotional eating. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 221. (Bodenlos, offered annually)

359 Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience This course surveys literature and theory representative of an important contemporary conceptual issue in behavioral neuroscience. Each year, topics for the course are announced in advance. The course is designed to include a nonspecialized group of students having a varied distribution of psychology courses and interested in developing conceptual relationships among different subdivisions within psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and at least one other psychology course. (Greenspon, offered occasionally)

370 Topics in Developmental Psychology This course surveys the theoretical and empirical literature associated with a contemporary issue in child and/or adolescent development. Topics are announced in advance. Possible topics include developmental psychopathology, peer relationships and friendship, and developmental transitions. Across topics, emphasis is placed on risk factors, the protective factors that contribute to positive adjustment, and the development of resilience. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 203 or PSY 205. (Kingery, offered occasionally)

373 Topics in Social Psychology This course surveys the empirical and theoretical literature associated with a significant contemporary issue in social psychology. Topics are announced in advance. Possible topics include stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination, political psychology, interpersonal relationships, persuasion and social influence, altruism and prosocial behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 227 or WMST 223. (Fisher, offered annually)

375 Topics in Cognitive Psychology In this seminar, students read primary research articles and study current theories and empirical findings in an area of cognition. Students are required to make substantial contributions to the course through classroom discussion. Topics vary from year to year; topics covered in the past include mental representation, accuracy of memories, creation of false memories, and flashbulb memories. Two substantial term papers are required. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and PSY 231. (Rizzella, offered occasionally)

450 Independent Study (Staff)

495 Honors (Staff)