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COURSE CATALOGUE : AMERICAN STUDIES

The American Studies program interprets American culture from an interdisciplinary point of view that combines critical social science and humanities approaches. The program provides a basis for graduate study in a variety of fields, as well as an excellent background for law, journalism, and other professional careers. American Studies offers an interdisciplinary major and minor. To count toward the major or minor, all courses must be passed with a grade of C or better.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
interdisciplinary, 11 courses
AMST 101, 201; two courses from the American Studies Foundations group; four AMST electives and two electives from the cross-listed courses or two additional AMST courses and AMST 465. At least two the AMST electives must be at the 300-level or above. A cross-listed 300-level elective may be substituted upon approval by advisor. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. No more than one credit/no credit courses can be counted towards the major. No more than three courses can be taken in one department outside of American Studies.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
interdisciplinary, 5 courses
AMST 101; one Foundations course; two AMST electives, one of which must be at the 300 level or above, and one cross listed elective or AMST course. A cross-listed 300-level elective may be substituted upon approval by advisor. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. No more than one credit/no credit courses can be counted towards the minor. No more than two courses can be taken in one department outside of American Studies.

TRANSFER CREDITS FOR THE MAJOR OR MINOR
Courses taken at other institutions, excepting HWS-sponsored abroad programs, are considered on a case-by-case basis. Students must petition the department for these courses to count towards the American Studies degree. Petition forms for transfer courses can be downloaded here.

AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES
Foundations Courses
Majors must take two foundations courses. Students may propose to count a course not listed with a solid rationale and the adviser’s permission. Minors must take at least one foundations course.

AFS 130 Radical Black Freedom and its Discontents
AFS 150 Foundations Africana Studies
AFS 180 The Black Atlantic
ARCH 110 Introduction to Architectural Studies
ANTH 110 Intro to Cultural Anthropology
ECON 120 Contemporary Issues
ECON 122 Economics of Caring
ECON 160 Principles of Economics
ENV 101 Sustainable Communities
ENV 110 Topics in Environmental Studies: Sense of Place
ENG 115 Literature and Social Movements
ENG 152 American Revolutions
ENG 165 Introduction to African American Literature
POL 110 Introduction to American Politics
HIST 111 Topics in Introduction to American History
LGBT 101 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Studies
MDSC 100 Introduction to Media and Society
MUSC 100 Introduction to Music Literature
PHIL 152 Continuing Issues: Philosophy & Feminism
PHIL 162 Ethics Civic Engagement
REL 109 Imagining American Religion(s)
SJSP 100 Foundations of Social Justice
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
WMST 100 Intro to Women's Studies

Inequalities and -Isms: These courses focus on how the people of the Americas define themselves or are defined by others through categories of difference: race, ethnicity, gender, religion, ability, class, sexuality, for example. How have such differences been constructed differently across American history? How are power, identity, and inequality produced in and across these categories of difference?

AFS 208 Growing Up Black
AFS 315 #blacklivesmatter
AFS 410 Deconstructing the Police
LGBT 204 Bodies of Difference
AMST/BIDS 288 White Mythologies
AMST 210 Sex and the City
AMST 260 Critical Family History
AMST 222 American Empire
AMST 221 Immigrant Arts: Intro to Asian American Cultures
AMST/SOC 223 Inequalities
LGBT 302 Trans Studies
LGBT 306 Sexuality and Space
LGTB 307 Transnational Intimacies
AMST 331 Harlem Goes Global: Black Politics & Cultures in the 1920s & 1930s
AMST 332 Racial Regimes & Antiracist Struggles
AMST 360 Debating Community: Controversies in the Public Humanities
ANTH 205 Race, Class and Ethnicity
ANTH 220 Sex Roles
ANTH 221 Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples
ANTH 282 North American Indians
ARTH 201 African American Art
BIDS 233 Race Class and Gender
BIDS 245 Men and Masculinity
ENVS 204 The Geography of Garbage
ECON 243 Political Economy of Race
ECON 248 Poverty and Welfare
ECON 310 Economics and Gender
ECON 313 African American Economic History
EDUC 201 Schooling and Social Equality
EDUC 209 Gender and Schooling
EDUC 252 History of Disability
EDUC 307 Civil Rights Education
EDUC 370 Multiculturalism
ENG 252 American Women Writers
ENG 251 Recovering African American Literature
ENG 360 Sexuality and American Literature
AMST 237 Environmental Justice in Indian Country
ENV 245 Radical Environmentalism
HIST 208 Women in American History
HIST 227 African American History I
HIST 228 African American History II
HIST 240 Immigration and Ethnicity in America
HIST 352 Wealth, Power and Prestige
AMST 215 Music and Race in US popular culture
POL 215 Racial and Ethnic Politics
POL 289 Theories of American Democracy
POL 348 Racisms, Class, and Conflict
REL 272 Sociology of the American Jew
SOC 206 Kids and Contention
SOC 221 Race and Ethnic Relations
SOC 226 Sociology of Sex and Gender
SOC 238 Immigrant America
SOC 251 Sociology of the City
SOC 261 Sociology of Education
THTR 309 Feminist Theatre
THTR 310 African American Theatre
WMST 204 Politics of Health
WMST 305 Food, Feminism, and Health
SOC 357 Race and Ethnicity
PHIL 250 Feminism: Ethics and Knowledge
WMST 150 Chicana Feminism and Visual Culture
WMST 219 Black Feminism
WRRH 284 Black Talk White Talk
WRRH 265 He Says, She Says: Language and Gender
ARTH 205 Gender and Display
AMST/BIDS 288 White Mythologies

Arts and Cultural Production: These courses explore American cultural forms, including art, film and visual culture, music, literature, sports/leisure pursuits, and performance. Such classes address how cultural productions are created, transformed, appropriated and transmitted across various contexts, as well as the role of artists, audiences, and the marketplace in shaping the meanings of these forms.

AFS 309 Black Cinema
AMST 207 Baseball and American Culture
AMST 215 Music and Race in US Popular Culture
AMST 221 Immigrant Arts: Intro to Asian American Cultures
AMST/ENG 261 Popular Fiction
AMST 250/ WMST 150 Chicana Feminism and Visual Culture
AMST/ ENG 351 Archives of American Literature
AMST 331 Harlem Goes Global: Black Politics & Cultures in the 1920s & 1930s
AMST 360 Debating Community
AMST 312 Arch, Space and Social Justice
AMST 317: Civil War in American Popular Memory
ARTH 201 African American Art
ARTH 250 Modern Art 1900-1960
ARTH 282 20th Century American Art
ARTH 333 Art Since 1960
ARTH 208 Art and Censorship
ARTH 205 Gender and Display
DAN 212 Dance History II
EDUC 201 Teaching, Learning and Popular Culture
EDUC 320 Children's Literature
ENG 250 Early American Literature
ENG 252 American Women Writers
ENG 253 Nineteenth-Century American Fiction
ENG 254 Nineteenth-Century American Poetry
ENG 260 Modern American Literature
ENG 264 Southern Fictions
ENG 265 Contemporary American Novel
ENG 266 Modernist American Poetry
ENG 267 Post WWII American Poetry
ENG 251 Recovering African American Literature
AMST 301 Cultural Theory and Popular Culture
ENG 353 Media in Early America
ENG 465 Reading Faulkner
ENV 202 Human Values and the Environment
MDSC 200 Cultures of Advertising
MSDC 203 History of Television
MUS 190 History of Rock and Roll
MUS 205 Music at the Movies
THTR 290 Theatre for Social Change
THTR 308 American Experimental Theatres
THTR 309 Feminist Theatre
THTR 310 African American Theatre
WMST 218 Queer Representation in Theater and Film
WRRH 309 Talk and Text II: Language in Action

Structures and Institutions: These courses address or explore American cultural politics through close study of the way institutions and infrastructures such as government, schools, prisons, capital, the built environment, democracy, social movements, or the law shape economic, political and social experience. These courses highlight the sites where social, political and economic ideals are both created and contested.

AFS 315 #blacklivesmatter
AFS 410 Deconstructing the Police
ARTH 308 Art and Censorship
AMST 207 Baseball and American Culture
LGBT 204 Bodies of Difference
AMST/SOC 223 Inequalities
AMST 260 Critical Family History
AMST 222 American Empire
AMST 237 Environmental Justice in Indian Country
AMST/BIDS 288 White Mythologies
LGBT 306 Sexuality and Space
AMST 332 Racial Regimes & Antiracist Struggles
ANTH 319 Feminist and Political Anthropology
ECON 203 Between Labor and Management: Unions
ECON 243 The Political Economy of Race
EDUC 308 Politics of Care
ECON 310 Economics and Gender
ECON 313 African American Economic History
EDUC 201 Schooling and Social Equality
EDUC 209: Gender and Schooling
EDUC 348 Our National Parks
EDUC 370 Multiculturalism
ENV 201 Environment and Society
ENV 202 Human Values and the Environment
ENV 205 Introduction to Environmental Law
ENV 245 Radical Environmentalism
ENV 320 Natural Resource Law
ENV 330 Sustainability, Commodities and Consumption
ENG 251 Recovering African American Literature
HIST 233 History of American Thought to 1865
HIST 234 History of American Thought from 1865 to Present
HIST 243 US Legal and Constitutional History to 1865
HIST 244 Us Legal and Constitutional History Since 1865
HIST 246 American Environmental History
HIST 306 The Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 352 Seminar: Wealth, Power and Prestige
POL 215 Racial and Ethnic Politics
POL 222 Political Parties
POL 229 State and Local Government
POL 289 Theories of American Democracy
POL 324 The American Congress
POL 325 The American Presidency
POL 326 Urban Politics
POL 332 American Constitutional Law
POL 333 Civil Rights
POL 334 Civil Liberties
POL 335 Law and Society
SOC 206 Kids and Contention
SOC 224 Social Deviance
SOC 225 Working Families
SOC 261 Sociology of Education
SOC 263 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 290 Sociology of Community
SOC 375 Social Policy
SPNE 210 Topics in Bilingual Education
WMST 204 Politics of Health
SOC 357: Race and Education
BIDS 202: Urban Politics and Education
BIDS 207 Contemporary American Cities
BIDS 214 Politics of Reproduction

Borders and Empires: These courses consider the U.S. in a global context. Where is/isn’t America, anyway? What constitutes its borders? How has American culture shaped and been shaped by ideas, products, policies, and people from other places? Courses in this area place America’s history and culture within a global context, engage questions of American empire or colonialism, consider the U.S. from an exterior perspective, or through global and transnational flows.

AFS 208 Growing Up Black
AFS 309 Black Cinema
AMST/RUSE 206 America Through Russian Eyes
AMST 222 American Empire
AMST 250/ WMST 150 Chicana Feminism and Visual Culture
LGBT 306 Sexuality and Space
LGBT 307 Transnational Intimacies
AMST 331 Harlem Goes Global: Black Politics & Cultures in the 1920s & 1930s
ANTH 220 Sex Roles: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
ANTH 323 Ethnographies of Capitalism
ANTH 340 Anthropology of the Global Commons
ARCH 310 Early Modern Architecture
ARCH 311 History of Modern Architecture
ARTH 250 Modern Art 1900-1960
ARTH 333 Art Since 1960
DAN 212 Dance History II
DAN 214 20th century Dance History
EDUC 205 Youth Migrations
ENG 270 Globalization and Literature
ENG 370 Geographies of Nowhere: Mapping the Frontier
AMST 237 Environmental Justice in Indian Country
HIST 205 Modern Mexican History
HIST 226 Colonial Latin America
HIST 240 Immigration and Ethnicity in America
HIST 327 Cold War in US Intervention in Central America
POL 249 Protests, Movements, Unions
POL 254 Globalization
POL 290 American Foreign Policy
REL 237 Christianity and Culture
REL 305 Tongues of Fire: Pentecostalism Worldwide
REL 347 Gender and Identity in the Muslim World
SPN 304 Body Border
WMST 213 Transnational Feminism and Performance
WRRH 280 Immigrant Experiences: Voices and Discourses
STUDY ABROAD [relevant courses with adviser permission]
MDSC 316 Narratives of Displacement
LTAM 210 Latin American Perspectives
AFS 180 The Black Atlantic

Theories and Approaches: These courses deepen students’ American Studies practice by exposing them to the range of theories and approaches that inform the field. Courses in cultural, economic, political, or social theory shape ways of knowing in the (inter)discipline. Methods courses such as ethnography, close-reading, film analysis, GIS/mapping, imaging, or statistics inform different varieties of American Studies research. Experiences with public humanities, digITA media, or community-based research allow students to use these critical tools in real world settings.

AMST 202 Drawing for Study and Storytelling
LGBT 204 Bodies of Difference
AMST 260 Critical Family History
AMST/BIDS 288 White Mythologies
AMST/SOC 223 Inequalities
AMST/ ENG 351 Archives of American Literature
AMST/ENG 301 Cultural Theory and Popular Culture
LGBT 302 Trans Studies
LGBT 306 Sexuality and Space
LGBT 307 Transnational Intimacies
AMST 332 Racial Regimes & Antiracist Struggles
AMST 330 DigITA Humanities
ANTH 273 Ethnographic Research and Methods
ANTH 306 History of Anthropological Theory
ARCH 204 Introduction to Historic Preservation
ARCH/ENV 351 Sustainable Community Development Methods
BIDS 200 Introductory Dialogues in Critical Social Studies
ENG 200 Critical Methods
ENG 205 Narrative Analysis
ENG 353 Media in Early America
ENG 399 Hybrid Forms
ENV 203 Fundamentals of GIS
ENV 210 Qualitative Research & the Community
ENV 310 Advanced GIS
HIST 229 Public History
HIST 233 History of American Thought to 1865
HIST 234 History of American Thought from 1865 to Present
MDSC 304 Media and Theory
MDSC 315 Introduction of Social Documentary
MDSC 206: Script to Screen: The Elements of Visual Storytelling
MUS 214 Music Criticism in Theory and Practice
PHIL 162 Ethics of Civic Engagement
PHIL 345 Power, Privilege and Knowledge
POL 289 Theories of American Democracy
POL 368 Contemporary Political Theory
POL 370 African American Political Thought
POL 375 Feminist Theory
POL 378 What is Socialism?
POL 380 Theories of International Relations
SJSP 101 Community Based Research
SOC 211 Research Methods
SOC 212 Data Analysis
SOC 220 Social Psychology
SOC 290 Sociology of Community
SOC 300 Classical Sociological Theory
THTR 290 Theatre for Social Change
WMST 300 Feminist Theory
WMST 301 Feminist Oral History
WMST 305 Food, Feminism, and Health
WRRH 250 Talk & Text: Introduction Discourse
WRRH 207 Sociolinguistics
WRRH 360 Power and Persuasion
WMST 219 Black Feminisms
BIDS 390 Video Essay

There may be additional newer courses with substantial American content or methodological relevance not listed here; students who wish to count such courses toward their American Studies major or minor should speak to their adviser.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AMST 101 Introduction to American Studies: Difference, Power, and Paradox How do American ideals such as freedom and individualism relate to American inequalities? Who counts as 'American' in particular places and times in the nation's history? Is 'America' itself a place or an idea? This introductory course in American Studies will engage a number of questions central to the field by focusing on how questions power and difference shape tensions and contradictions in American culture. Students will examine American paradoxes such as the "American Dream," freedom and equality, immigration and the "melting pot," as well as infrastructures like consumer culture, democracy, and national borders though an interdisciplinary lens. The course also introduces students to American Studies methods through a close interdisciplinary analysis of a variety of cultural artifacts such as popular fiction, leisure, music, performance, propaganda and social practices. Readings are drawn from a range of sources including politics, history, popular culture, literature, media studies, and contemporary theory. Offered each semester.

AMST 201 Methods of American Studies This class introduces American Studies as a scholarly field, and investigates how American Studies scholars, think, argue, research and write. Beginning with the history of American Studies, students read “classical” works and identify the major intellectual and methodological questions of the field. Course materials include American Studies scholarship across the 20th century, including the “myth and symbol” school; literary and feminist critiques; material and popular culture; questions of border, empire, and nation; and critical race studies. Students will also practice the archival and other research techniques underlying interdisciplinary research, and explore the limitations and benefits of the different tools we can use to study the U.S. (Staff, offered annually)

AMST 202 Drawing for Study and Storytelling This course introduces students to the habits and approaches of using drawing as a visualizing tool to think, represent and interpret the world and ourselves in a sketchbook. We use drawing as a medium for critical observation and study, creative work, and expressive storytelling about places, spaces, and society. All our drawing is done on-site in sketchbooks and without any measuring tools or straightedges. Our primary media are pencil, ink and watercolor. We draw objects, furniture, interiors, buildings, social spaces, imagined places and natural scenery. Along the way, we explore several traditions of drawing including: fine arts, architecture and urban sketching, food illustration, doodling, conceptual cartography and map illustration. Students gain skills in freehand line drawing, watercolor, visual abstraction, proportion/geometry, texture/value, and page composition. This course involves meeting in a classroom as well as meeting on location to draw. Drawing sites include buildings and garden spaces on the HWS campus and in the local city area, Course occasionally offered off campus as part of CGE faculty-led study abroad. Open to first year students only by permission. Offered each semester/Makker.

AMST 206 America Through Russian Eyes How do you define America? Does your definition mesh with what the rest of the world might think? This course explores American culture and identify through readings and films by American and Russian poets, novelists, and directors. From Red scares through the Cold War and Evil Empire all the way to the New Russians, twentieth-and twenty-first-century Americans and Russians have shared a deep mutual fascination, and have often defined themselves via contrast with the forbidding, alluring Other. We will study travelogues, memoirs, novels, stories, and films by artists as diverse as John Steinbeck, Langston Hughes, Gary Shteyngart, Ellen Litman, and Aleksei Balabanov, using these works to refine our own understanding of American culture. All readings and discussions will be in English. Register for either AMST 206 (prerequisite: AMST 100) or RUSE 206 (prerequisite: RUSE 112 or HIST 263) or permission.

AMST 207 Baseball and America This class focuses on baseball and its relationship to American culture. For a long time, baseball has been the quintessential American game. In this class, we will examine the role (s) of technology, media, culture and nationalism in explaining the unique role of baseball to the American identify.

AMST 215 Music & Race in US Popular Cultures This course examines intersections of race and music in United States history from the later nineteenth century to the present day. Through non-technical analysis (no previous knowledge of music required) of a variety of musical styles, you will learn to identify ways in which music and performative gesture underscored, subverted, and sometimes transcended racial stereotypes.

AMST 221 Immigrant Arts This course explores the history of Asian American expressive cultures. Among the essential questions we will ask are: What different forms and sensibilities have Asian American writers and artists adopted in their work? How have these forms and sensibilities changed over time, and why? What can we discern of the relationship between culture, politics, and society? How have the experiences and representations of Asian American existence been mediated by class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship? And, Finally, how can we trace a cultural history of Asian Americans through the interpretation of novels, poetry, short stories, music, paintings, photography, sequential art, films, popular genre fiction, and cookbooks? Students will use and interdisciplinary framework to answer these questions, combining the insights of critical race theory, cultural studies, literary scholarship, and history.

AMST 222 American Empire Over the course of the twentieth century, the United States came to wield increasing power over much of the globe. This central fact of American life has defined US politics, culture, and society. Yet many Americans know little of their country’s actions abroad. This cultivated ignorance has allowed foreign policy to be governed by a small group of elites and their specialists. It also diminishes the realities of violence in faraway places. This course addresses this collective innocence of foreign affairs by mapping the history of the American empire.

AMST 237 Environmental Justice in Indian Country American Indians have since 'time immemorial' had an immediate relationship to the natural world and their physical surroundings. Many native peoples are rooted to place. This course explores American Indian relationships to nature and eco- political responses to contemporary environmental issues. Beginning with the history of American Indian political relationships with the U.S. federal government, we will consider the various and complex ways in which this history has affected and continues to affect American Indian ecology, agricultural land use, natural resource conservation, urban pollution, and modem environmental movements. Topics may include: resource use; land claims; sacred and ecologically unique places; hunting and fishing rights; food and agriculture; and traditional ecological knowledge. Students in this course will be introduced to the writings and ideas of Indigenous scholars and activists such as Vine Deloria, Jr.

AMST 260 Critical Family History “In all of us there is a hunger, marrow-deep, to know our heritage-to know who we are and where we have come from. Without this enriching knowledge, there is a hollow yearning. No matter what our attainments in life, there is still a vacuum, an emptiness, and the most disquieting loneliness.” ~Alex Haley
Over the past 20 years, family history has experienced a remarkable upsurge in interest. From TV shows that ask “Who do you think you are?” to the popularity of DNA testing, individuals in America and beyond have engaged in personal journeys of discovery, seeking to find stories from their past. While research into family history can be personal, the research journey forces investigators to come in contact with the major forces that have shaped American life: immigration, changes in labor and social life, urbanization and suburbanization, and military conflicts and political upheavals. This course asks students to connect their individual lives and their ancestors’ history to larger social and political contexts, paying particular attention to how issues of racism, classism, sexism and other structural inequalities shape individual opportunity. Through a close examination of past lives and journeys, students are guided to reflect on how their ancestors’ experiences (and their own) are shaped by social and historical context. This course defines “family” and “ancestor” in broad terms and allows students to pursue research into the lives of not only of blood relatives but into any individual the student feels is part of their family.

AMST 301 Cultural Theory Course also listed as ENG 301. This course introduces cultural studies as a major area of contemporary theory which has reshaped the way we think and write about literature. Critical cultural studies, historicism, and reader-response theory have expanded understandings of literary meaning to include production and reception of those texts as well as their ideological content and consequences. Students read theoretical essays by such thinkers as Marx, Gramsci, Althusser, Foucault, White, Butler, and Baudrillard, as well as examples of scholars applying these ideas to the study of literature and other cultural forms. Students will then become the critics, applying these theories to the contemporary literary, material and popular culture “texts” that surround them--stories, poems, film, photographs, toys, fashion, sports, and music.

AMST 312 Architecture, Space and Social Justice: Theory and Practice This course introduces students to the contemporary field of Critical Space Theory and Practice, a field of increasing influence in 21st century architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, public health, and community planning and city studies. In engaging with Critical Space Theory and Practice, we examine the ways that space-whether designed or DIY or virtual--is never neutral and thus has the ability to exclude, oppress, and/or perpetuate social hierarchies. Given this, we look at how designers, builders, and users of the build environment might participate in producing more inclusive, just, and socially sustainable places. Readings in Critical Space Theory have emerged from the fields of cultural geography, feminist theory, philosophy, sociology, American studies, and architectural theory. Course is structured into 8 weeks of intensive reading followed by 6 weeks of focused group project work in which students put theory to practice and test lessons gained earlier in the semester. Key questions in this course include: What role does the built environment play in the generation of social ties and community health and, further, what is the responsibility of the architect (or other trained "expert") in that equation? Can user-agency be designed into the ways we make space or habitats (housing, cities, play spaces, clothing-as-habitat). This course also prompts scrutiny of the field of architecture in the context of this theory and practice. We ask: Who has access to 'good' architecture and becoming an architect? How are value and merit decided in the field of architecture? What is architecture's purpose? What is "responsible" architecture-socially, politically, and ecologically? How do we make inclusive places? We explore ideas and approaches to making space from the fields of public-interest design, public art, ecological design, social theory, and community activism. Finally, we learn methods and creative approaches for making space that have the potential to be culturally inclusive, charged with political resistance, and spark social change. SOs or above. Offered annually, Makker.

AMST 330 DigITA Humanities The term “digITA humanities” has a plethora of different definitions, ranging from the idea of fusing digITA tools to perform traditional humanities work; studying modes of new media as objects of humanistic inquiry; and a new culture and ethos of collaboration. In this course we’ll be using the tools of digITA technologies to extend our inquiry into the cultural productions of the United States. Through a mix of seminar discussions, hands-on tutorials, and project-based work, this course will provide students with theoretical and practical foundations for working in the DigITA Humanities, covering topics such as digitization, encoding, analysis, and visualization. The centerpiece of this class will be a digITA humanities project: you will do your own original research into nineteenth century dime novels to make an on-line exhibit for our library. Creating this project will teach you the skills of humanities scholars-research, writing and analyzing, and will let you put this knowledge to work. No technical background is required.

AMST 331 Harlem Goes Global Between World War I and World War II, there was an explosion of artistic and literary production by African Americans. Commonly referred to as the “Harlem Renaissance,” the cultural outburst notably produced Black migrants who escaped the racial oppression of the “Jim Crow” South and found new freedoms in northern cities such as New York. But the migrations of this period were actually much more complex and widespread, involving the movement of Black artists, intellectuals, and workers across the Americas, Africa, Europe, and Asia. This course explores the politics and culture of the global African Diaspora in this exciting period using both traditional research approaches and emerging digITA humanities methods such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

AMST 332 Racial Regimes & Anti-Racist Struggles Human rights activist Malcolm X asserted that racism is like a Cadillac-they make a new model every year. In this course, students will examine historical and theoretical scholarship to gain an understanding of how racism in the US has taken different forms over the past century and into the present. We will investigate the institutions of “Jim Crow” segregation, settler colonialism, the gatekeeper nation, and mass incarceration, as well as how these structures of racism intersect with other forms of oppression including labor exploitation and hetero-patriarchy. Emphasis will be placed on how racial regimes change over time in a dialectical relationship with anti-racist struggles.

AMST 351 Archives of American Literature Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote that "language is the archives of history." This course will explore early American history through literature. In addition to reading historical fiction, autobiography, epic poetry, and other genres that revisit and revise the past, we will investigate how researchers come to know it. In other words, we will study the theory and practice of archives. What do these literary examinations of the country's past say about its present? How is the historical record created and preserved for, and how will it be accessed in, the future? Who and what gets left out, and why does it matter? Our authors, who may include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, Lydia Marie Child, and Pauline Hopkins, will use writing to reckon with the past. And so will we.

AMST 360 Debating Community: Controversies in the Public Humanities This courses focuses on the public work of American Studies: the techniques, concerns and practical issues of engaged scholars. Through examining a series of controversial public humanities projects students will explore community cultural development How do communities make decisions about what is worth saving, worth remember and why? How do these narratives and memories shape and transform common understandings of community? In turn, how do common understandings dictate the usage and extent of a community’s control over its neighborhood? Struggles over the meaning and usage of community serve as a catalyst for conversations about how historical narrative is crafted in places often overlooked by conventional histories. Students will also be introduced to the work of public scholars in the fields of community cultural development historic preservation and museum studies, and examine the contexts- public policy and economics- that shape the work of non- profit cultural organizations. Offered spring semester every other year, Belanger

AMST 465 Senior Seminar (Offered annually)

Preparing Students to Lead Lives of Consequence.