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PSS

Parallels

Jud Hartmann ’70

His series of bronze sculptures, “The Woodland Tribes of the Northeast,” represent one of the most comprehensive explorations of eastern native peoples ever undertaken. One commission, a pair of seven and a half foot tall Iroquois lacrosse players, is installed in front of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Museum in Baltimore, Md. His work can be found in private and corporate collections internationally.

1. Donatello or Michelangelo, who dominates in 3-D? Michelangelo

2. What fires the imagination and inspires a new piece? Historical research of the Woodland Tribes of the Northeast inspires me, fires my imagination!

3. What is challenging to sculpt or convey through your pieces? The greatest challenge and the goal is to capture the soul, bring them to life.

4. Where do you see your work displayed in your wildest dreams? Monumental work in public spaces and in the great museums (I have some in each).

5. What music gets you out of bed and going in the morning? Classical music of the baroque era.

6. What is your ideal artist’s work environment? A peaceful, serene environment – close to nature.

7. Your HWS “Ah ha moment”? I was a student during the Vietnam War era, so those years at Hobart helped absolutely to shape who I am: liberal, progressive and passionately an environmentalist.

8. Favorite HWS faculty member and why? Alva Kelly, my squash coach, a warm and sensitive human being who I loved very much.

9. Are you more likely to take to the outdoors or have pictures of it? I’m virtually always outside. I’m a Nordic ski racer (marathons – 50 Km races) so that is a year-around commitment.

10. If you could spend a month anywhere in the world, where would it be? Tahiti, Tuscany, the British Isles

12. Was there a turning point in your career (professional/ academic) where you committed to art over something else? About six months after graduating, I was living on an island in the Caribbean when I struck a chisel with a mallet into a piece of mahogany. In that moment, the path I was to follow was revealed to me. I’ve been following it ever since.

Andrew Hellmund ’14

The architecture major was among only 20 artists whose work was included in the 2012 Biennial Sculpture Invitational at the Krasl Arts Center in St. Joseph, Mich. A 2013 Julius G. Blocker Fellow, he was awarded the 2012 Technos International Fellowship to Japan. He is a member of the Genocide Symposium Board, peer ministry and the architecture society.

1. Donatello or Michelangelo, who dominates in 3-D? Donatello

2. What fires the imagination and inspires a new piece? Meeting with other creatives and designers, as well as the different forms of the metal and recycled metal shapes themselves.

3. What is challenging to sculpt or convey through your pieces? To show relationships among different styles and modes of exploration.

4. Where do you see your work displayed in your wildest dreams? Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, N.Y.

5. What music gets you out of bed and going in the morning? ’80s Rock

6. What is your ideal artist’s work environment? A large space with a crane

7. Your HWS “Ah ha moment”? A rocking architectural studies dept. and access to a place to create sculpture.

8. Favorite HWS faculty member and why? Several faculty members have had a profound impact during the last few years. Currently I am working most closely with my advisor Ted Aub, who has been someone to bounce ideas off, get critiques from, and who has provided the encouragement and access to space to do sculpture from the get go (not to mention he has a great sense of humor).

9. Are you more likely to take to the outdoors or have pictures of it? Outdoor adventures provide for an inner calm.

10. If you could spend a month anywhere in the world, where would it be? Backpacking around the Andes with a group of friends.

12. Was there a turning point in your career (professional/academic) where you committed to art over something else? I had to choose between spending more time with sculpture/architecture/art or continue rowing. The lessons learned in rowing were exponential, but it was right to dedicate more time to my studies.