2021 SUMMER RESEARCH PROJECTS

About Summer Research

Conducting research with a faculty member is an important opportunity. Not only do you develop a close mentoring relationship with a faculty member and dive deeply into a subject, you gain important skills that open doors for careers in a variety of disciplines. Summer research can be the springboard to honors, graduate school and career. Some summer research students present their work at regional or national professional conference; some even publish their work.

Summer research students spend part of their summer on campus working intensively with a faculty member. The amount of time and start date vary with the project and will be worked out in conjunction with the faculty mentor. Students receive housing on campus and a weekly stipend of $500. Each student is required to produce a short written summary of their research and present a poster at the Summer Research Symposium during Parent and Family Weekend.

How to Apply

  • Read project descriptions and identify the project(s) that interest you.
  • Contact potential faculty mentors to discuss the details of the planned projects. These initial conversations, while informal can be essential in identifying the best potential research partnerships.
  • Identify two HWS references.
  • Complete one application. You may apply to at most five projects through the application site. You will be able to apply for all five through one submission.

Deadline for student applications: Monday, February 22, 2021

Students will be notified of placement in mid-March.


Art + Architecture

Biology

Chemistry

Computer Science

Economics

Education

English

Entrepreneurial Studies

Environmental Studies

Finger Lakes Institute

Fisher Center

Geoscience

Physics

Spanish and Hispanic Studies

Theatre



Art + Architecture

Architecture Design/Build + Critical Research Projects

Architecture Design/Build + Critical Research Projects: This summer opportunity will allow for selected students to work alongside their faculty mentor on community engaged design/build project and critical spatial research including but not limited to the continued development of Crystal Street Community Garden in Geneva’s East Lakeview neighborhood and experimental research into wearable architecture. Students will be asked to work on various aspects of each project, which will require in-depth research, material explorations and collaboration that will ultimately lead to design/build opportunities at various scales.
Mentor: Gabriella D'Angelo
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Architectural Studies prerequisite courses (Arch 110, Arts 115, Arts 125).
Preferred Qualifications: Aptitude and desire to: research; work in the woodshop; experiment with materials and learn new de-sign skills and methods of fabrication; engage with, learn from and work with community.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



BIOLOGY

Urban wildlife ecology & evolution

Cities are the fastest growing ecosystem on Earth and focal points of environmental change. Students will explore the effects of urbanization on the ecology and evolution of wildlife, with a focus on eastern gray squirrels. The species has two color morphs that are genetically-based: gray and melanic. Once common in forested areas, the melanic morph is now most prevalent in cities. Students will conduct field sampling to test hypotheses about how urbanization affects the evolution of squirrel coat color. Students will be based in Syracuse, NY and gain a variety of field experiences, which may include 1) conducting visual surveys to understand how urban and rural environments affect the prevalence of squirrel color morphs, 2) using radiotelemetry to compare survival rates of color morphs in urban and rural areas, and 3) measuring crypsis of color morphs in different environments. The students will be part of a collaborative group including researchers and students at HWS and SUNY-ESF. Learn more about the project here.
Mentor: Brad Cosentino, John Vanek
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Strong work ethic. Enthusiasm for field ecology and wildlife. Ability to work collaboratively, and must be comfortable doing field work in rural and urban environments. A driver’s license is required.
Preferred Qualifications: Pursuing a degree in biology or environmental studies.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Drug development of anti-cancer agents

My research involves developing small molecule, anti-cancer agents. The compounds are designed in collaboration with HWS organic chemist, Prof. Pelkey. The biological results allow us to determine what structural requirements are important for making an effective compound, and we use this information to refine the molecules for increased potency. We have identified numerous promising compounds, and we have discovered that they inhibit tubulin polymerization, which is an important target for blocking growth of cancer cells. Students will determine the effectiveness of the potential cancer inhibitors. Experiments may include tissue culture work, cell viability assays, enzymatic activity assays, fluorescent microscopy, bacterial studies, and protein studies. I will teach you the assays, help you interpret the results, and guide you through the trouble-shooting process. We will have regular group meetings with the Pelkey group to discuss results and new directions for compound development.
Mentor: Patricia Mowery
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Completed or currently enrolled in Introductory Biology.
Preferred Qualifications: Completed or currently enrolled in Cell Biology, Genetics, or Microbiology preferred. Completed or currently enrolled in Organic Chemistry I preferred.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Various projects at Cornell AgriTech

Interested in an exciting research experience working with an international team of scientists, graduate students, and undergraduates while using a variety of cutting-edge techniques? You will gain invaluable research experience whether your goal is medicine, graduate school, a science job post college, or just to learn if you want to work in science. Projects will be completed in the laboratories of the Cornell Agri Tech in Geneva, and students will live on the HWS campus. Projects may involve applied ecology, bioinformatics, disease control, food science, gene expression, genetics, horticulture, insect behavior, microbiology, molecular biology, or pathology (see https://scholars.pppmb.cals.cornell.edu - you only have to complete the HWS application form). We will place students according to their general interests and academic background.
Program Liaison: Patricia Mowery
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Completion or currently in a majors introductory science course or Math 130.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Investigating the evolutionary history of milkweeds

First Project: Milkweeds are a recent rapid evolutionary radiation that has resulted in diversification of more than 100 species in North America. These species have served as models for plant reproduction and plant defense, most notably in the study of coevolution with monarch butterflies, which are able to sequester the cardenolide toxins produced by the plants for their own defense. This study will investigate the genomic evidence for the evolutionary relationships among species through simultaneous targeted sequencing of 3000+ nuclear genes and whole chloroplast genomes from multiple populations per species followed by phylogenomic analyses. Students will acquire bioinformatics and Illumina DNA sequence data analysis skills, including genome assembly and annotation. Individual student projects may focus on questions involving phylogenetic relationships, morphological character evolution, molecular or genome evolution, or species delimitation.

Second Project: The milkweed and dogbane flowering plant family includes >5,000 species that are well-known for their secondary metabolites that mediate interactions with insect herbivores. Multiple insect lineages have evolved mechanisms to tolerate these toxins, sequester them to make themselves unpalatable to predators, or even use them in mating pheromone synthesis. Resolution of plant evolutionary relationships is required to understand secondary metabolite biochemical pathway evolution. Evolutionary relationships will be investigated through simultaneous targeted sequencing of 800+ nuclear genes and chloroplast genomes followed by phylogenomic analyses. Research students will acquire lab skills, including DNA extraction and sequencing, and gain bioinformatics and DNA sequence analysis experience. Student research questions may address evolutionary relationships, conflict between nuclear and chloroplast genomes, use of genetic data to resolve taxonomic questions, or molecular evolution.
Mentor: Shannon Straub
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: BIOL 167 and one additional BIOL course
Preferred Qualifications: Preferred background courses include one or more of BIOL 215, BIOL 220, BIOL 222, and BIOL 228.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Fish Assemblages in Finger Lakes Streams

Stream fish assemblages are susceptible to many stressors from the watershed. We will assess fish community composition in NYS Park streams [in the Finger Lakes region] to determine habitat suitability for Brook Trout reintroduction. Stream habitat, benthic macroinvertebrate, and electrofishing surveys will be conducted to determine current stream community health. Secondly, fish tissue samples will also be collected in the southern Finger Lake inlets to assess mercury bioaccumulation in aquatic foodwebs as part of a larger study. Fieldwork will involve long days outside, but will teach a variety of skills including benthic macroinvertebrate collection and identification, netting for electrofishing and fish identification, as well as water quality and stream habitat surveys. Students will learn how to collect and organize data, calibrate equipment, and process samples in the lab as well, and will have to work independently as well as part of a team.
Mentor: Susan Cushman
Project Duration: 6 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Ability to carry 30 lbs of field equipment, coursework in Biology 200 B category, and a passion for aquatic biology. They must also have a willingness and tolerance for conducting fieldwork in potentially buggy, hot, and humid conditions. Student must be organized, responsible, motivated to work efficiently, and pay attention to detail.
Preferred Qualifications: Aquatic Biology coursework, sophomore status, and driver's license.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Audubon's Seabird Restoration Program in the Gulf of Maine

HWS students have the opportunity to participate in the internationally-recognized Audubon Seabird Restoration Program (Project Puffin). ASRP operates 7 island stations along the Maine coast as critical seabird sanctuaries. Interns work under an Island Supervisor, participating in all aspects of seabird (i.e. tern and puffin) management, including conducting population censuses, monitoring productivity and growth; conducting diet studies; banding and resighting birds; removing invasive vegetation; and assisting with predator management. Interns live on an island for the summer. Food and supplies are delivered every 2 weeks. In a seabird colony, the birds are loud and defensive. Living conditions are primitive. A cabin/wall tent serves as the base of operations, and interns sleep in tents on platforms. Field stations have limited electricity, propane stoves, composting toilets, and no running water. Cooking, cleaning, and camp maintenance duties are shared by all island team members. The program has careful Covid protocols. The work can be conducted by isolating interns on offshore islands, minimizing any risk of Covid transmission. These protocols were successfully conducted during the 2020 field work season without incident.
Program Liaison: Mark Deutchlander
Project Duration: 12 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: BIOL 167 and one additional BIOL course, preferably BIOL 215, 225, 227, 228, 234, 238 or ENV 216.
Preferred Qualifications: Preference will be given to students interested in careers in conservation, or animal or wildlife research. Before applying, please meet with Prof. Deutschlander to discuss your interests and obtain a supplemental application for Audubon.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Chemistry

Synthesis and Characterization of Molecular Wire Candidates

The overarching goal of my research group is to develop synthetic methods for the production of molecular wire candidates that will contribute to the fabrication of small molecule molecular devices that can be used to replace the silicon chip in current day technology. Students in my research group will work with me to fabricate and analyze three different types of organometallic molecular wire candidates. Organometallic compounds are those that use BOTH organic and inorganic chemistry to synthesize new materials. These complexes will then be characterized by a number of spectroscopic techniques (IR, NMR, GC-MS), and their properties will be investigated and tested for their electronic properties using electrochemistry. Students who are interested in expanding their knowledge in chemistry and open to working in a lab that uses organic, inorganic, and analytical chemistry on a regular basis are encouraged to reach out to me.
Mentor: Christine de Denus
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Students must have (1) completed both CHEM 110 and 120, or CHEM 110 and 240 by June 2021, (b) a willingness to learn new chemistry, (c) no competing commitments (other jobs, classes, internships).

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Understanding Inefficiencies in Water Purification: Studying Biofouling Mechanisms

Access to clean drinking water is critical, meaning these technologies need to be super-efficient. My group studies what factors cause biofouling, the clogging of membranes during purification due to biological molecules. Understanding more the roles of solution chemistry (pH, salt level and salt identity), we are now curious about the impact of solution temperature and amino acid sequence. Studying temperature requires building a temperature controller (or fridge) for the fouling simulator. Understanding the impact of the amino acid sequence requires building our own peptides, which has been optimized. Students will take active roles in making the peptides or building the temperature controller. Students will be trained in how to use all of the equipment and will conduct fouling experiments using the simulator themselves. We will also work together to analyze the data using Microsoft Excel to determine what conditions cause the least fouling.
Mentor: Elana Stennett
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Chem 110 & Chem 120 or Chem 190. If the student would like to do some synthesis, they need to have completed Chem 240.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Synthesis of Biologically Active Heterocycles

The objective of this research is to design and develop new synthetic methods that can be utilized to prepare heterocycles with demonstrated biological activity. This summer, depending on student interest, we will decide to work on one or more of the following projects: (1) the direct arylation of heterocyclic enaminones; (2) the synthesis of bisindole pyrrolones and furanones and their fused analogs; and/or (3) oxidative arylation of anilines or aziridines. These projects will contribute substrates for biological testing in anti-cancer cell assays by Professor Mowery and her research students. Students involved in this research will run reactions, purify synthetic intermediates, analyze products by NMR and by other methods, and help design new experiments. Students involved in this research tend to continue working on their projects during the academic year and this is encouraged.
Mentor: Erin Pelkey
Project Duration: 10 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: CHEM 110
Preferred Qualifications: CHEM 241

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Synthetic Methods for Masking and Accessing Biologically Relevant Functional Groups and Compounds

Students will develop methods for masking and revealing functional groups in potential pharmaceutical compounds. The goal is to generate molecules with reactivities that can be altered after they enter living cells. Students will also synthesize potential anticancer chemotherapeutics using synthetic methodology developed in the Miller laboratory. Research in the Miller group is performed collaboratively, with students and mentor working together in the lab. As training progresses and students learn the techniques involved, students gain confidence in themselves and each other while also becoming more independent.
Mentor: Justin Miller
Project Duration: 6 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: One year of college chemistry
Preferred Qualifications: While it will help to have some organic chemistry, this is not necessary, and students have joined the group without any organic chemistry.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

How does crowding in a cell affect the speed of enzymes?

In the Slade lab, we want to better understand how enzymes behave in the crowded environment of a living cell. This summer, the focus will be on the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase, which plays a crucial role in removing toxic compounds form your body during metabolism. In this project, students will learn how to set-up, monitor, and analyze data from an enzyme assay to learn information about its kinetics. However, no previous experience is necessary. I will mentor you daily to help learn and develop these skills. Student work will entail making buffers, micropipetting (a lot!), using a microplate reader (UV/Vis spectroscopy) spectrophotometer, and analyzing data in two different software programs. Working on this project will greatly improve a student's Excel skills.
Mentor: Kristin Slade
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Chem 120 and curious!

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Chemistry of Art

The selected student will develop projects and experiments for a course on the Chemistry of Art.  For example, we will learn the technology for reproducing a Medieval Italian panel painting with gilding, producing ancient pigments, and conserving works of art.
Mentor: Walter Bowyer
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Interest in science and art

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Computer Science

Parallel Computing for Neuroscience Simulations

Computer simulations are often used to advance research in neuroscience by performing virtual experiments on the brain. However, standard computing methods are inherently slow, severely limiting the usefulness of simulations. This project addresses the question of how well parallel computing, using multicore processors, can improve neural simulation efficiency. The research assistant will construct and test software using two different parallel computing methods: (1) multithreading and (2) graphical processing units, known as GPUs. Building on a software framework already in the lab, the student will increase the size of the neuroscience model that is used for the simulation. Additionally, the student will conduct extensive testing of the simulation efficiency to obtain empirical results, suitable for publication.
Mentor: Chris Fietkiewicz
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Completed CPSC 124 (Intro to Computer Programming)
Preferred Qualifications: Completed CPSC 331 (Operating Systems)



Economics

Effect of accession to the WTO on income distribution in Vietnam

Vietnam has experienced rapid economic growth in the last three decades with a mean GDP growth rate of 6.8 percent per year. During the period, Vietnam’s openness to trade soared from 39% to 60%. One of the crucial policy reforms during the period is Vietnam’s accession to the World Trade Organization, which decreased the average tariff rates from 20% in 2006 to 8% in 2009. This project attempts to analyze the distributional impact of Vietnam’s globalization. The student researcher is expected to research the context of Vietnam that affects the distribution of gains from trade through literature review. The scope of the review will include the effects of Vietnam’s trade policy reforms and the trade geography within the country. Also, the student researcher will participate in the data analysis to accurately select the samples and minimize the measurement errors. The faculty mentor will guide the research process and develop the theoretical framework of the project.
Mentor: Sooyoung Lee
Project Duration: 7 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Completion of ECON 160 and ECON 202, attention to detail, strong work ethic, and curiosity
Preferred Qualifications: Completion of ECON 304



Education

Computational Discrete Mathematics

We use computationally intensive approaches to studying, searching for, and optimizing discrete mathematical structures in both pure and applied settings. Possible foci include the enumeration of circulant graphs, modeling and optimizing British Parliamentary Debate tournament structures, graph Ramsey theory, and relationships among prime numbers. All topics lend themselves to innovative pedagogy; however, our emphasis is mathematical and computational. The work requires excellent attention to detail, persistence in the face of frustration and a lack of solutions, and creative imagination. Students will spend roughly half their time working on a research focus of their own with my help; the rest of the time they will help me with one of my questions. All work will be highly collaborative, thinking and coding side by side (or if virtually, screen by screen) and then also exchanging our individual work for mutual critique and further development.
Mentor: Paul Kehle
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: CPSC 225, CPSC 327, MATH 214, MATH 350
Preferred Qualifications: TEP Student, MATH 375



English

Shakespeare on Screen

This summer we will work together to build a new resource for Shakespeare scholars: a website that offers a searchable database of the hundreds of Shakespeare productions that have been filmed and commercially released. Your responsibilities for this project will include: a) helping to strategize an overall plan for the site; b) writing all the necessary code for the back end (most likely using Jekyll, but we can consider other options); c) helping to design the front end of the site; d) importing the data that I have already assembled; and e) filling in any remaining gaps in the data; and f) polishing the final product to bring it live by the end of the summer.
Mentor: Rob Carson
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Familiarity with Jekyll, Javascript, and/or Python
Preferred Qualifications: Experience with website design

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Entrepreneurial Studies

The Dark Sides of Development and Entrepreneurship

Development and entrepreneurship greatly need critical perspectives in their scholarship, teaching, and practice. Despite their positive connotations, harm can occur, despite the best intentions and well-thought processes. Scholars seek to unsettle both fields through critique, and educators are rising to the task. Accessible language and exemplars for teaching, practice, and research are needed. Dark side theory is an avenue for such pursuits. Dark-gray-light language can help evaluate the motives/processes/impacts of entrepreneurs/enterprises. This project will result multiple publications in: Entrepreneurship Education & Pedagogy, Social Enterprise Journal, and Journal of Social Entrepreneurship. Students will assist with literature reviews, unearth examples of gray/dark entrepreneurs and enterprises (e.g., vaping, drug cartels, Big Pharma), and create teaching, practice, and research materials that can be evaluated in the real-world through future data collection/analyses.
Mentor: Craig Talmage
Project Duration: 6 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Experience writing annotated bibliographies Google Drive tools experience (Docs, Sheets, and Slides) MS Office Suite experience (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) Experience making tables and graphs in Google Sheets or MS Excel
Preferred Qualifications: Experience writing summaries of the literature Quantitative research skills including statistical analyses Qualitative research skills including content analysis

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Environmental Studies

Stream Salamanders and Land Use Legacy and/or Long Term Carbon Monitoring at Cooper's Woods

First Project: The Finger Lakes National Forest is a place with a long history of anthropogenic land use, including agricultural. We will investigate the role of land use legacy and historic and current agriculture on the populations of stream salamanders in the Finger Lakes National Forest. Students will primarily be conducting field work to characterize the habitat in streams and along streams, and to measure salamander abundance at our sites. Students will also be entering their field data and will conduct preliminary analysis on the data. Students will learn how to measure habitat characteristics such as stream substrate and riparian vegetation, and will also learn how to identify stream salamanders in the field. Students will also be taught data entry skills, and basic data analysis.

Second Project: We will set up a long-term monitoring system at Cooper's Woods to measure current carbon storage and future sequestration. Students will be setting up permanent plots that can be revisited in future years. Students will set up and measure vegetation to being a long term study on the impacts of white-tailed deer in Cooper's woods. Students will learn tree, shrub, and woody plant ID, and how to take forest measurements. Students will also conduct a preliminary analysis with their data.
Mentor: Kristen Brubaker
Project Duration: 6 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: One 200 level biology or ENV 200
Preferred Qualifications: Ability to drive a car, able to conduct field work in varying conditions



Finger Lakes Institute

Aquatic Ecology Research in the Finger Lakes

Students will work with FLI staff members on a variety of applied research projects across the Finger Lakes focused on topics including nutrient levels, harmful algal blooms, and mercury cycling in zooplankton and fish. Students from a range of disciplines (e.g. Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Geoscience, Mathematics, and Physics ) are encouraged to apply, as this work can involve aquatic optics and remote sensing, cutting-edge molecular and single-cell analyses, sensor design, mercury bioaccumulation in aquatic foodwebs, and traditional aquatic ecological approaches. Positions will involve substantial training in field and laboratory techniques, and can include long days in the field from a variety of boats under all weather conditions, as well as laboratory preparation and analyses.
Mentor: Lisa Cleckner
Project Duration: 10 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Experience with laboratory science; keen interest in aquatic systems including lakes, streams, watersheds; enthusiasm; ability to contribute to a team while completing individual goals and projects; ability to cope with adverse field conditions including rain, heat, waves.
Preferred Qualifications: Coursework in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Geoscience, Mathematics, and/or Physics.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Fisher Center

Stephen W. Woodworth '54 Fisher Center Student Summer Fellowship

The Stephen W. Woodworth ’54 Fisher Center Student Summer Fellowship offers students in the Humanities, Social Sciences and Fine and Performing Arts an opportunity to pursue their own academic projects over the summer. While the type of research or project is wide open to fields such as English, Dance, Religious Studies, History, Education, Art, Sociology, Women’s Studies, Lesbian and Gay Studies, and so on, the work must reflect The Fisher Center’s mission of social justice around issues of gender, race, and class.
Program Liaison: Alla Ivanchikova
Project Duration: 8 weeks

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Geoscience

Paleoplankton of the Onondaga Sea

The Onondaga Limestone records the environmental history of middle Devonian time in New York, southern Ontario, parts of Michigan, and beyond. Macrofossils within the Onondaga are well studied; however, the microbiota of this ancient sea is less well known. Sporadic research shows that marine algae were present, but no research includes the Onondaga in the Finger Lakes. We will identify potential productive outcrops of Onondaga, collect samples, and then microscopically analyze petrographic slides to seek and identify microbial benthos or plankton inhabiting this ancient sea. Students will conduct a systematic microscopic tabulation and analysis of materials preserved in prepared chert samples. In addition, students will investigate and identify new sampling locations, assist in sampling as possible, and conduct a literature review on the history of microbial studies of the Onondaga.
Mentor: David Kendrick
Project Duration: 6 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Attention to detail, self-motivating, ability to work with others, organized, systematic, able to follow instructions.
Preferred Qualifications: The following are helpful but not required: Experience with microscopes, Geo 184, Geo 380, Geo 320.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Eocene Leaves of Hatchetigbee Bluff and/or Microplastics in the Finger Lakes

Project I: The recent discovery of a small fossil flora from Washington County, Alabama opens the opportunity to look at vegetation diversity and climate in southeastern North America during the warmest climate Earth has experienced in the last 100 million years. The coastal environment of the flora also opens a new environmental window. This project will begin by assembling a catalogue of previously published fossil leaf descriptions for this time and place. It will continue with preparation, description and identification of the fossils. It will conclude with a climate and environmental analysis, linking this discovery with the rich marine invertebrate record from the site.

Project II: Microplastics—bits of plastic debris < 5mm in length—have become ubiquitous in the environment. Scientists are only beginning to document their abundance, sources, movement and sinks. This project will document the microplastic abundance in the local atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and geosphere. We will pilot sampling, extraction and analysis techniques for microplastics 1) deposited directly from the atmosphere, 2) in lake, storm and drinking water, 3) in lake sediment, and 4) in filter-feeding lacustrine invertebrates. Data gathered this summer will help develop larger projects for evaluating how these pollutants move through the regional environment.
Mentor: Nan Crystal Arens
Project Duration: 6 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Independence and the ability to follow instructions. Library research experience. Patience and attention to detail. Good hand-eye coordination and the ability to concentrate on detail-oriented tasks.
Preferred Qualifications: Coursework in Geoscience and biology.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

Arctic Extreme Low Visibility Weather Events and/or Winter Weather and Lake-Effect Snowstorms and/or Frontal Impacts on Lake Effect Snow Bands off of Lake Ontario

Project I: This project will investigate the frequency and weather conditions associated with extreme low visibility events in the Arctic Region. Locations in Greenland, northern Canada, and Alaska will be used to investigate the seasonal variation of extreme low visibility events and the weather conditions responsible for these events. The research will use data from a variety of sources which may include surface weather, soundings, video image archives, and model reanalysis data sets. Both statistical and GIS analyses will be incorporate into the project.

Project II: Projects will examine several aspects of winter weather and lake-¬effect snowstorms by conducting climatological and mesoscale meteorological research. Students will use data from a variety of sources which may include weather radar, soundings, surface weather, satellite, reanalysis, and numerical weather models.

Project III: Lake-effect snow is a high-impact meteorological phenomenon that can result in feet of snow in a short period of time. The vast majority of this snow falls in close proximity to the lake shore but at times can extend inland for large distances. Observations have shown numerous instances where an Arctic cold front settling south from Canada can cause this lake-effect snow to become 'dislodged' from the lake and settle inland. However, it's unclear how often and under what conditions this interaction occurs. This student will examine the past ten years of lake-effect snow data to determine the frequency and impact of the interactions between ongoing lake-effect snow bands and Arctic cold fronts. Further investigation will try to elucidate the mechanisms that make these interactions possible.
Mentors: Neil Laird and Nick Metz
Project Duration: 9 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Coursework in meteorology is essential. Familiarity with SPSS and GIS is beneficial, but not necessary. Should have excellent oral and written communication skills and be willing to work within a collaborative group setting.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Physics

Programming and Data analysis skills applied to a variety of science problems

Several projects are available which involve writing and running computer programs, primarily in Python, to analyze existing time series data for investigating a variety of science questions. For example, the Sun and other stars generate magnetic fields through the movement of the hot, ionized plasma that makes up all stars. Several projects are available which all involve analyzing light curves or spectra of stars that host transiting planets to identify observable manifestations of magnetic fields to gain a better understanding of these processes and how they  might impact the planet’s ability to form and sustain life. Other projects involve analyzing data from a low-cost spectroradiometer system that continuously observes a water surface and collects time series spectra of the light that is reflected. The observed spectra of reflected light depend on the aquatic constituents present, so it is a way to study the contents of the water, including harmful algal blooms.
Mentor: Leslie Hebb
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Physics major, python or R programming experience.



Spanish and Hispanic Studies

Textbook - Spanish for the Professions

My research assistant will help me continue to develop my textbook for a Spanish for the Professions course entitled “Manos a la obra: el español profesional para trabajar con la comunidad”, for which I already have one completed chapter, as well as a submitted proposal. My research assistant will search for relevant and current news articles, develop ideas for exercises and activities, write short research-based articles to be included in the book, locate appropriate images, and acquire permission for the use of copyrighted materials. The student will fine-tune their research skills, learn the steps involved in writing a textbook, gain experience with copyright policies, practice their written abilities in Spanish and expand their knowledge of the language. Finally, they will become familiar with the needs of our local Spanish-speaking community and help develop ways to facilitate meaningful engagement between our students and said community.
Mentor: Caroline Travalia
Project Duration: 8 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Successful completion of at least 2 courses at Level II (203-299).
Preferred Qualifications: Successful completion of at least 1 course at Level III (300-349) or above.

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores



Theatre

From Beyond: Staging Geneva's Unheard Voices

In collaboration with the Geneva Historical Society, this project will continue the “From Beyond” performance series. Students will work alongside Professor Woodworth to conduct archival research on un- and under-represented figures from Geneva’s history and adapt research findings to theatrical scripts. Students will also have an opportunity to share their research process through public panels in conjunction with the Fall HWS Theatre production. Students working on this project will: Explore the history of Geneva, re-centering voices that have been historically marginalized due to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, etc. Cultivate archival research skills, delving into archives at the Historical Society, Finger Lakes Times, City of Geneva, and HWS. Utilize digitized research resources, namely in the shape of newspapers. Transform archival research into a series of theatrical monologues that will be performed as part of the Fall 2021 HWS Theatre production.
Mentor: Chris Woodworth
Project Duration: 6 weeks
Minimum Qualifications: Successful completion of at least one course from the Theatre History/Dramatic Literature category within the Theatre Department OR participation in the Winter 2021 HWS Theatre production Supernatural Saunter.
Preferred Qualifications: Previous experience exploring archival materials (digital archives OR in-person engagement).

Appropriate for Rising Sophomores

MORE INFO

Applicants should speak to the faculty mentor(s) for the proposed project(s) before their submitting their application here. Questions about the program in general should be directed to rusinko@hws.edu.


Apply here

 

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