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PROGRAMS

Peers Educating Peers (PEP)

PEP are student mentors who work with the Office of Alcohol and Other Drug Programs (AOD) to facilitate interactive programming with HWS students. The peer educators are responsible for presenting the actual social norms to the HWS community. They produce and disseminate information on how to reduce at-risk behaviors associated with health, wellness and alcohol. The non-judgmental, harm reduction approach of the facilitators provides a forum to discuss responsible decision making and choices around day to day living, health, wellness and alcohol consumption. The student peers work in pairs and each present four to eight campus-wide presentations with likely audiences within the residence halls, theme houses, athletes, and student organizations on campus.

Each program is catered and designed for the participating audience. Programs can be adapted specifically for gender or other special interests.

Student-Athlete Health Awareness Peer Educators (SHAPE)

The Student-Athlete Health Awareness Peer Educators (SHAPE) program is designed to train student-athletes as peer educators regarding healthy choices as it relates to a variety of health and wellness topics. The goal is to facilitate discussion among teammates concerning healthy living and promote accurate information through interactive small group programs. Through open discussion concerning nutrition, exercise, sleep, the athlete recovery process, stress, and alcohol, the SHAPE facilitators encourage and challenge fellow teammates to think about one's choices and how this might impact the individual's or team's peak performance.

Health and Wellness First-Year Seminar

This program focuses on helping students to think about their health and wellness while transitioning to college and becoming a member of the HWS community. Programs are gender-based, small groups, offered during the first four weeks of the fall semester, and are held in residence halls across campus. The program engages and challenges students to take responsibility for and make proactive choices when it comes to their health and wellness. Students are encouraged to intervene with their peers by building community and standing up for their rights and resist being the recipient of secondary effects of another individuals high-risk drinking or other drug use.

Educational Seminars and Programs

The AOD Office offers a variety of educational programs that focus on alcohol and other drug use. The following are current program offerings that students can participate in by contacting the office:

  • Alcohol Seminar
  • Marijuana Seminar
  • Brief Alcohol Screening
  • Brief Marijuana Screening
  • Two-Week Alcohol Educational Group

SERVICES

Counseling Services

AOD provides individual, couple and group counseling to all full-time students who are concerned about their own substance use or who are concerned about the substance use of a family member, friend or significant other.
Counseling services provides a safe and neutral place for students to express their concerns to a New York State Credentialed Substance Abuse Counselor. All counseling sessions are confidential and information cannot be released to a third party without prior consent.

For faculty and staff who are concerned about a colleague or family member, AOD is available for consultation regarding what resources are available.

Substance Free Housing

Hobart and William Smith provide options for students who choose to live in an environment that is free from alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Established in 2000, the Substance Free House is a theme house on campus where students can live and learn together. HWS has also introduced Substance Free Floors: floors in traditional residence halls where all students agree to maintain a substance free lifestyle.

Students living in substance free housing work with the Office to provide alternative programming for the HWS community. Over the years, the Substance Free House has become best known for its Root-Beer Keg Parties. The house has also sponsored events such as a welcome party for first-year students, a Halloween Party, and a Safe Spring Break initiative.