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Provost Briefs

Biology

In March of 2013, Mark Deutschlander was elected into the position of second Vice-President of the Wilson Ornithological Society, the second largest and second oldest scientific ornithological society in North America. He also co-presented a paper with Hobart graduate Bob Taylor ’11 at the annual meeting for WOS, “Energetics and orientation in an irruptive migrant, the Black-capped chickadee Poecile atricapillus.” Mark also published two papers recently. He was first author for a paper in Wilson Journal of Ornithology. The second paper was a co-authorship with scientists at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, in the Journal of Economic Entomology.

Meghan Brown had a grant renewed through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to continue her studies of invasive species in the Finger Lakes. She published three papers in 2012, in the Journal of Limnology and Oceanography, Journal of Paleolimnology, and Journal of Great Lakes Research. She co-led the study abroad program to Queensland, Australia.

David Droney published an article in the Journal of Chemical Ecology, with collaborators at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station - Droney DC, Musto CJ, Mancuso K, Roelofs WL, Linn CE Jr. (2012). The response to selection for broad male response to female sex pheromone and its implications for divergence in close-range mating behavior in the European corn borer moth, Ostrinia nubilalis. J Chem Ecol. 2012 Dec;38(12):1504-12. doi: 10.1007/s10886-012-0208-5. Epub 2012 Nov 6.

Kristy Kenyon presented with William Smith graduate Josephine Stout ’12 at the 71st Annual Society for Developmental Biology Meeting in Montreal, Canada during the summer of 2012. The presentation was based on Stout’s Honors project examining novel protein interactions with implications in Drosophila embryogenesis. In January of 2013, Kristy presented a poster and co-led a session at the NSF-sponsored Transforming Undergraduate Science Education Program PI Conference. These presentations were connected to Kenyon’s NSF TUESII grant with collaborator Sally Hoskins (CUNY).