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Deutchman Addresses Yates Progressives

Posted on Thursday, October 18, 2012

Professor of Political Science Iva Deutchman addressed the Yates Progressives on Sunday, Oct. 21, discussing the 2012 Presidential Election in a lively discussion. The event was featured in an article in the Penn Yan Observer.

The talk, which is free and open to the public, delved into what the campaign season and election process have meant for the electoral system - and what it has taught us about the American public. Deutchman also provided insight into what a Romney or an Obama win would mean for the country's future.

"The most alarming and interesting fact I have seen over the last 20 years is that the Republican Party is moving farther and farther right," Deutchman is quoted as saying during the event. "I think in many ways it is largely responsible for why each party finds it harder to work together. The Democrats are pretty centrist, and that goes for Obama and most in congress."

Deutchman holds a Ph.D. and a master's degree in political science from the University of Pennsylvania, and a bachelor's degree from Hofstra University in political science and economics. She is a professor of 20 plus years who has worked on two continents (Australia and North America). She has a long list of publications in major journals, the latest of which are "Electoral Challenges of Moderate Factions: Main Streeters and Blue Dogs, 1994- 2008," The Forum, Vol. 8: Iss2, Article 2 (2010) (with DeWayne Lucas); "Five Factions, Two Parties: Caucus Membership in the House of Representatives, 1994- 2002," Congress and the Presidency, 36:62-84, 2009 (with colleague DeWayne Lucas); and "Fundamentalist Christians, Raunch Culture and Post-industrial Capitalism," Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, Summer 2008.

She has been a senior lecturer and visiting scholar at the University of Melbourne numerous times. Deutchman's expertise in Australia has been cited in U.S.-based publications as well as in Australia in The Australian, The Age, Australian Time and Arena. Most recently, she taught a graduate course on "President Barack Obama and the World" at the University of Melbourne in Australia in 2010.

The full article about the event follows.

The Observer
Professor looks at party, election details

Wednesday • October 24, 2012

PENN YAN -- Political science professor Iva Deutchman spoke to the Yates County Progressives during their meeting Sunday, Oct. 21, presenting the group with her insights on the 2012 elections and the overall state of politics in America.

Deutchman is a political science professor at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, as well as the former host of a radio show on National Public Radio (NPR).

Deutchman spoke about how the 2012 election is being portrayed as an election between a far-left candidate in President Barack Obama and a far-right candidate in Mitt Romney. In actuality, Deutchman said the election is more between a far-right candidate and a moderate-right candidate, and that the Democratic Party has not nominated a true progressive since George McGovern in 1972.

"The most alarming and interesting fact I have seen over the last 20 years is that the Republican Party is moving farther and farther right," Deutchman said. "I think in many ways it is largely responsible for why each party finds it harder to work together. The Democrats are pretty centrist, and that goes for Obama and most in congress."

Deutchman said for a two-party system to work properly, one party needs to meet the other at least some part of the way. She said this has become a rare instance in the past 20 years of politics, due in large part to the Republican Party taking firmer stances on their issues and expressing less of a willingness to negotiate.
Deutchman also spoke to the Yates County Progressives on where Romney voters are coming from. She said most conservative voters think people should look out for and take care of themselves, and that they think a big-government "nanny state" is insane.

"People must be responsible for consequences of their actions," Deutchman said. "It's a different way of thinking about things. It's a legitimate way to look at the world."

Deutchman said that has always been the major issue between the two parties in determining just how big a role the government should have.

Deutchman encouraged all those at the meeting to attend a debate she is moderating at Hobart and William Smith Colleges Friday, Oct. 26 between Republican Congressman Tom Reed and Democratic candidate Nate Shinagawa.

She said the questions were created by her students and that it should be a very informative evening on their views on both state and national issues.

 

 


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