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2012-2014 CATALOGUE

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2012-2014 COURSE CATALOGUE : THEATRE

The Theatre Program offers opportunities for participation in the performance and production of faculty-directed productions in the Bartlett Theatre in addition to a variety of courses in theatrical production, performance, theory, history and literature.

The Theatre Program offers both disciplinary and interdisciplinary minors.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DISCIPLINARY MINOR
5.5 courses
At least 5.5 courses including THTR 178, THTR 278, one semester (0.5 credit) of THTR 900, and three elective courses in theatre selected from the two groups of courses below. At least one of the electives must be from the Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory Group and at least one must be from the Theatre Production and Performance Group. The additional elective may be taken from either group. Two additional semesters of THTR 900 may be used as the third elective. At least four courses must be at the 200-level or above and at least three courses must be unique to the minor. The minor may include no more than one independent study in theatre. All courses must be completed with a C- or better.

Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory
THTR 220 Theatre History I
THTR 242 American Experimental Theatre
THTR 270 American Drama
THTR 310 African American Theatre
THTR 328 European Drama from Lessing to Ibsen
THTR 379 Modern European Drama
THTR 423 Theatre for Social Change
THTR 424 Writing about Performance

Theatrical Production and Performance
THTR 179 Introduction to Stage Craft
THTR 225 Introduction to Lighting Design
THTR 275 Acting II
THTR 305 Advanced Acting Styles (may be repeated)
THTR 307 Playwriting Workshop
THTR 386 Shakespearean Performance
THTR 900 Theatre Production

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR
5.5 courses
At least 5.5 courses including THTR 178, THTR 278, one semester (0.5 credits) of THTR 900, and three elective courses selected from the two groups of courses listed below. Two of the elective courses must be outside of Theatre, at least one of the electives must be from the Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory Group and at least one must be from the Theatre Production and Performance Group. The additional elective may be taken from either group. THTR 900 may not be used as an elective. At least four courses must be at the 200-level or above and at least three courses must be unique to the minor. The minor may include no more than one independent study in theatre. All courses must be completed with a C- or better.

Dramatic Literature, History, and Theory
CLAS 108 Greek Tragedy
CLAS 213 Ancient Comedy and Satire
ENG 225 Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies
ENG 226 Shakespeare: Tragedies
ENG 251 Medieval Drama
FRNE 255 Modern French Theatre
MUS 206 Opera as Drama
SPNE 322 Theatre and Social Change in Latin America
SPN 355 Contemporary Theater: Innovations in Hispanic Drama
THTR 242 American Experimental Theatre
THTR 270 American Drama
THTR 328 European Drama from Lessing to Ibsen
THTR 379 Modern European Drama
THTR 380 Modern Drama
THTR 423 Theatre for Social Change
THTR 424 Writing about Performance

Theatrical Production and Performance
EDUC 220 Storytelling
EDUC 301 Drama in Developmental Context
THTR 179 Introduction to Stage Craft
THTR 225 Introduction to Lighting Design
THTR 275 Acting II
THTR 305 Advanced Acting Styles (may be repeated)
THTR 307 Playwriting Workshop
THTR 386 Shakespearean Performance

Course Descriptions (THTR)
178 Acting I This course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the craft of acting through the use of improvisation, theatre games, and acting exercises. Actor training focuses on and makes use of individual and group exercises that challenge both the mind and the body. Emphasis is placed on developing concentration and focus, the use of the imagination, sensory awareness, and verbal and physical improvisational skills. Exercises are designed to encourage the acting student to listen to his or her impulses and to respond to them within the context of an imaginary circumstance. Students also learn to work off of a partner in order to discover their own true and authentic responses to another person. This course is a prerequisite for Acting II. (Hatch, Staff, offered each semester)

179 Introduction to Stage Craft This is a lecture/laboratory course which will provide students with a practical overview of the fundamentals of design and stagecraft for the theater. Students will explore the relationships between production values and stagecraft via weekly readings and lecture/discussions. In addition, they will complete a weekly lab (and two weekend labs) in which they will work in Bartlett Theatre and in the Theatre shop working on current faculty-directed productions. Students will receive hands-on experience with set construction and will learn how to safely and effectively manipulate all theatrical production systems (lighting, rigging, audio, etc.) in an expressive manner. (Burd, spring, alternate years)

220 Theatre History I Through an examination of the people, events, works, documents, institutions, and social conditions of the theatrical past, this course will explore the development of theatre from the fifth century B.C.E. to approximately 1700 C.E. Students will be introduced to the theoretical issues surrounding the writing of history as well as research practices and opportunities in the field of theatre history,. Students will interpret salient dramatic and theoretical texts and illustrate the ways in which these texts connect to the making of theatre as well as the ways in which theatre shapes and reflects larger culture (s). Over the course of this semester, students will explore pivotal moments in theatre history including Ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe, Classical India, Yuan China, Early Modern England, Renaissance Italy, Neoclassical France, the Spanish golden Age, and Restoration England. Students will engage with historic material in a wide array of modes including research, performance, and design.

225 Introduction to Lighting Design This is a lecture/laboratory course in lighting for the stage. We will study elements of design, approaches to script and dance analysis, graphic notation and electrical practice. Students will produce portfolio projects and mount a final project for a performance on campus. Prerequisite: THTR 179. (Burd, fall, alternate years)

270 American Drama This course studies the history of dramatic literature and theatrical performance from the early 20th century, with the plays of Rachel Crothers, Eugene O’Neill and Susan Glaspell, to the present, with the theatrical experiments of the Ontological-Hysteric Theatre and the Wooster Group. The course traces the development of dramatic forms, theatrical organizations, and changing styles in directing, acting and design. Prerequisite: THTR 278. (Gross, Hatch, offered every three years)

275 Acting II A continuation of the skills discovered in Acting I, this course is designed to deepen the student’s understanding of the craft of acting through the use of structured improvisations, acting exercises, and scene work. Actor training focuses on and makes use of individual and group exercises that can be applied to the use of a text. The acting student goes further into his or her explorations of the emotional life, learns how to create a basic who/what/ where scene using a text, learns about the importance of cause and effect sequencing, and works on mastering the skill of working off of a partner as well as listening and responding truthfully. The acting student also learns about the basic function of rehearsal and how to research a role. Prerequisite: THTR 178. (Hatch, Spring, alternate years)

278 Introduction to Dramatic Literature How is reading a play different from reading other forms of literature? How do the realities of theatrical production challenge us to think about reading and interpretation differently? We will look at playtexts from the perspective of the designer, actor, and director. Readings will range widely, from Asian to European, “classic” to contemporary. (Gross, Hatch Fall)

280 Stage Management In his seminal book The Back Stage Guide to Stage Management, Thomas A. Kelly describes stage managers as "responsible and adaptable communicators who have the ability to handle and coordinate diverse groups of artistic personalities with tactful discipline and a sense of humor. They establish a creative environment by combining the ability to prioritize and anticipate and solve problems, with calm sensitivity and grace under pressure. Their ability to do the above stems from organizational ability, acquired technical knowledge...,familiarity with union requirements, and an inspirational personality that creates positive energy." This class examines the way in which stage managers fulfill these wide-ranging duties, studying the process of stage management from pre-production to closing night. Stage Management emphasizes practical knowledge and skill development, through case studies, generation of a prompt book for a hypothetical production, and the observation of the rehearsal process as it is practiced at the collegiate and professional levels.

295 The Performing Arts in Balinese Culture This course will be a three week intensive exploration into the rich performing arts tradition of Bali, Indonesia. Students will be immersed in various aspects of Balinese performing arts including Dance, Masked Performance, Traditional Instrument Performance, Shadow Puppetry, and Mask Carving. Courses will be Taught alongside master artists at the Mekar Bhuana conservatory in Depansar, Bali. This conservatory will serve us particularly well due to their mission to uphold the ways of traditional Balinese performing arts rather than what is becoming a more tourist-centric morphing of many of the traditional forms. Studio work will be supplemented with attendance at profession productions of different Balinese performing arts allowing students to see what they are studying at a professional level and allowing them to learn and experience how ingrained the performing arts are in other aspects of Balinese culture. Planned excursions will also take us to visit various crafts-people throughout the region allowing us to see how Balinese instruments, masks, and puppets are made.

305 Advanced Acting Styles In Advanced Acting Styles, students will continue to master the skills of the performer developed in Acting I & II: physical action, full expressivity of body/voice/imagination, listening/responding, creation of ensemble, memorization, and rehearsal discipline. Students will memorize and perform scenes and monologues, and they will document in writing both the craft and creativity of the rehearsal process. Each time the course is offered, a different era, genre, or style of acting will be studied in-depth (for example, 20th century Absurdists, Shakespeare, Brecht’s Theater of Alienation). This course can be repeated for full credit three times with a different focus each time. Prerequisite: THTR 275 or permission of instructor. (Gross, Hatch, Spring, offered alternate years)

307 Playwriting Workshop This course is designed to further the understanding of the craft of playwriting as it is first discovered in the playwriting process workshop. Students are encouraged to nurture the development of their skills through daily writing exercises, to develop a personal and consistent process for writing, to shake up any preconceived notions about playwriting, to explore a personal point of view or voice for their writing, to develop and sharpen their skills in analysis and critique, to test the flexibility of creative thought necessary for the crafting of dramatic literature, and to complete a short one-act play by the end of the semester. Prerequisite: THTR 178 or 278. (Gross, Spring, offered alternate years)

309 Feminist Theatre This course will survey twentieth and twenty-first century British and American feminist theatre, focusing on performance texts that address salient concerns of first, second, and third wave feminisms as well as performance modes that trouble such designations. Specifically, this course will examine the oft-marginalized role of women in mainstream commercial theatre both historically and within contemporary contexts. It will also explore the ways in which feminist theatre practitioners work in coalition with other social justice movements such as suffrage, workers rights, civil rights, and LGBT rights to create works that resist and/or redefine historically misogynistic modes of performance. The course will explore the ways in which notions of corporeality, intersectionality, poststructuralism, performativity and the gaze have shaped feminist performance traditions.

310 African American Theatre African American productions within the dominant culture's performance traditions (such as minstrelsy) in order to better understand the profound challenges facing black artists, the overwhelming area of study will be black authors, practitioners, and theorists from the 1900s to the present day.

320 Theatre History II Through an examination of the people, events, works, documents, institutions, and social conditions of the theatrical past, this course will explore the development of theatre from approximately 1700 C. E. to the present. Students will build on the historiographical methodologies pertaining to the writing of history that were introduced in theatre History I, as well as research practices and opportunities in the filed of theatre history. Students will interpret salient dramatic and theoretical texts as well as archival material and illustrate the ways in which these texts connect to the making of theatre as well as the ways in which theatre shapes and reflects larger culture(s). Over the course of this semester, students will explore pivotal moments in theatre history including 18th century Continental Theatre, 18th Century Sentimental and Laughing Comedy and Bourgeois Tragedy, German Romanticism, Chinese Opera, Melodrama, Modern Realism, French symbolism, the historical avant-garde (Dada, Futurism, Expressionism, Surrealism), Post-War Theatre, Theatre of the Absurd, Epic Theatre, Postmodern Theatre. Students will engage with historic material at an advanced level in a wide array of odes including research, performance, and design.

386 Shakespearean Performance A performance-oriented approach to Shakespeare. Starting with the sonnets, actors will learn to consider meter, rhythm, rhetoric, and imagery as they inform characterization and dramatic action. During a weekly laboratory, we will view and analyze recorded and videotaped performances of Shakespeare’s plays. (Hatch, spring alternate years)

424 Writing about Performance Looking at a variety of theatrical performances—live and recorded, spoken and sung, on campus and in regional theatres—we will try to capture the theatrical experience in writing. The challenges of description, interpretation, and evaluation will be engaged, and we will look at a variety of reviews and critical writings to sharpen our awareness of the problems involved. Prerequisite: THTR 178 or 278. (Gross, Spring, offered alternate years)

450 Independent Study Consent of instructor required (Staff, offered each semester)

900 Theatre Production This course is a studio-based course on the art and craft of producing theatre. It is open to all students who are cast in, or are part of the production team (which may include actors, designers, stage managers, production crew, etc.) for a faculty directed production. Students will acquire first-hand experience with the process of mounting a play on stage. Students will be involved, as appropriate, given their part in the play, in any and all aspects of the production process, including auditions, rehearsals, production meetings, set construction, and performances. This is a half-credit course which may be taken only once a semester but which may be repeated up to four times. This course must be taken credit/no credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Gross, Hatch, offered each semester)