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2014-2016 COURSE CATALOGUE : SPANISH AND HISPANIC STUDIES

The Spanish and Hispanic Studies Department meets the demands and expectations of students as they confront the global situation of the third millennium in which the language and cultures of the Hispanic world play a crucial role. The program is built on the premise that language and culture are inseparable: every step in the process of becoming proficient in language must be rooted in culture and, conversely, language proficiency is the necessary foundation for all true understanding of culture. We promote the intellectual and moral expansion that must typify a liberal arts education, making students more conscious of the linguistic dimension that is the essence of human society and deepening their understanding of how identity is both product and producer of the fabric of culture.

Delving into the ethnically diverse and conflictive genesis of both imperial Spain and colonial Latin America, our program traces some of the main features and events of the Hispanic world, as it has evolved and continues to evolve, on both sides of the Atlantic. Covering the multifaceted cultural topography of Spain and Latin America, as well as the more recent manifestations of Hispanic culture in the U.S., the Spanish and Hispanic Studies Department offers, by definition, a profoundly multicultural academic experience, one firmly grounded in bilingualism and intended for students of diverse backgrounds. Recent innovations include the integration of the latest multimedia technology in order to create a fully interactive learning experience that encompasses the cultural richness of the Hispanic world.

Study Abroad
All Spanish and Hispanic Studies students are strongly encouraged to study one semester abroad. The department sponsors two off-campus immersion programs: Spain and Costa Rica. In these programs students live with families, take all courses in the target language, and speak only in Spanish. All four courses taken in the Spain and Costa Rica programs will count for the major, three for the minor. Courses from other off-campus programs must be pre-approved by the department. A maximum of four course credits from off-campus study may be applied to the major, three to the minor. For Spain and Costa Rica the language requirement is five semesters of Spanish or the equivalent (at least one course at level II).

Curriculum
Spanish and Hispanic Studies courses are organized into four sequential levels: I, II, III, and IV. Courses at level I (100s) focus on fundamental language skills and must be taken in sequence. Courses at level II (200s) focus on communication and culture. Courses at level III (300-349) establish foundations of literature, culture and linguistics, and courses at level IV (350 and above) offer advanced seminars on literature, culture and linguistics. Two courses at level II are required to move to level III, and two at level III to move up to level IV.

The Spanish and Hispanic Studies Department offers a disciplinary major and a disciplinary minor in Spanish and Hispanic Studies, an interdisciplinary minor in Hispanic Studies, and a disciplinary minor in Latino Culture. Only courses completed with a grade of C- or better may count toward the major or minor.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN SPANISH AND HISPANIC STUDIES (B.A.)
disciplinary, 11 courses
Eleven Spanish and Hispanic Studies courses, including three SPAN courses from level II (200s), three SPAN courses from level III (300 to 349), three SPAN courses from level IV (350 and above), and two more courses which can be either SPAN courses at levels III or IV, or SPNE courses (taught in English with a Hispanic content). Students may apply up to four courses in department-sponsored programs in Spain and Costa Rica towards this major. Courses in non-departmental programs must be pre-approved by the SHS Dept. With the department's approval a course at a higher level can replace a course at a lower level. In addition to completing courses, students must produce a senior portfolio before graduating. Please consult with a major adviser or the Chair of the Department for more information about the senior portfolio requirement.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DISCIPLINARY MINOR IN SPANISH AND HISPANIC STUDIES
disciplinary, 6 courses
Six Spanish and Hispanic studies courses, including three courses from level II, and three courses from level III, only one of which can be an SPNE course (taught in English with a Hispanic content). Students may apply three courses in department-sponsored programs in Spain and Costa Rica towards this minor. Courses in non-departmental programs must be pre-approved by the SHS Dept. With the department's approval a course at a higher level can replace a course at a lower level.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR IN HISPANIC STUDIES
interdisciplinary, 6 courses
Six courses selected in consultation with an adviser in the SHS Department and including two SPAN courses at level II, two at level III or above, and two courses in other disciplines (see suggested list of non-departmental courses below). Only one of the courses at level III or above can be an SPNE course (taught in English with Hispanic content) or an equivalent course offered abroad. Students may apply two courses in department-sponsored programs in Spain and Costa Rica towards this minor. Courses in non-departmental programs abroad must be pre-approved by the Spanish and Hispanic Studies Department. With the department's approval a course at a higher level can replace a course at a lower level. Suggested non-departmental courses: AFS 200, AFS 320, ANTH 115, ANTH 205, ANTH 227, ANTH 297, BIDS 235, BIDS 286, ECON 135, ECON 240, ECON 344, ECON 435, EDUC 370, ENG 318, HIST 205, HIST 226, HIST 231, HIST 240, HIT 327, HIST 330, LTAM 210, POL 255, POL 348, REL 238, SOC 221, SOC 233.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR IN LATINO CULTURE
disciplinary, 6 courses
Six courses selected in consultation with an adviser in the program and including two courses from the advanced language cluster (SPAN 225 Hispanic Media, SPAN 231 The Art of Translation, SPAN 260 Advanced Grammar and Composition) and two courses from the Culture, Literature, and Linguistics cluster (SPNE 226 Screen Latinos, SPNE 311 The Latino Experience, SPAN 304 Body/Border, SPAN 332 Literatura infantil, SPAN 355 Contemporary Theater, SPAN 365 Literature and Music of the Hispanic Caribbean, SPAN 385 Sounds of Spanish).Two additional courses may be selected from either group or from the following selected courses: AFS 200 Ghettoscapes; LTAM 232 The Latina Experience. With departmental permission, other courses on Latino issues may count towards a minor in Latino Culture.

COURSE LEVELS
Level I: Fundamental Language Skills
SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I
SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II
SPAN 121 Intermediate Spanish I
SPAN 122 Intermediate Spanish II

Level II: Communication and Culture
SPAN 203 Spanish for Conversation and Debate
SPAN 225 Hispanic Media: Contemporary Issues
SPAN 231 The Art of Translation
SPAN 260 Spanish Writing Workshop

Level III: Foundations: Literature, Culture and Linguistics
SPAN 304 Body/Border
SPAN 306 ¡Cómo mola! Introducción a la lingüística española
SPAN 308 Culture and Identity in Spanish America
SPAN 316 Voces de Mujeres
SPAN 317 Arte y Revolución
SPAN 318 La España del Siglo de Oro
SPAN 321 Cuentos de América Latina
SPAN 332 Literatura infantil
SPAN 336 Spain: The Making of a Nation
SPAN 340 Spanish Cinema
SPAN 344 Rutas literarias de España
SPAN 345 Latin American Literary Frontiers

Level IV: Seminars: Literature, Culture and Linguistics
SPAN 355 Contemporary Theater: Innovations in Hispanic Drama
SPAN 360 Special Topics: Hispanic Studies
SPAN 361 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
SPAN 362 Two Wars, Two Generations
SPAN 365 Literature and Music of the Hispanic Caribbean
SPAN 372 Contemporary Spanish Novel
SPAN 374 In the Shadow of Dulcinea
SPAN 385 Sounds of Spanish
SPAN 392 Latin American Women’s Writings
SPAN 410 Spanish Golden Age: Renaissance and Baroque
SPAN 420 Contemporary Latin American Novel
SPAN 450 Independent Study
SPAN 490 Cervantes: Don Quixote
SPAN 495 Honors

Courses Taught in English with Hispanic Content: SPNE and BIDS
BIDS 286 Gender, Nation, Literature
SPNE 226 Screen Latinos
SPNE 311 The Latino Experience
SPNE 322 Theater and Social Change in Latin America
SPNE 325 Special Topics: Hispanic Studies
SPNE 330 Latina Writing in the United States
SPNE 345 The Paradoxes of Fiction: Latin American Contemporary Narrative
SPNE 355 García Márquez: The Major Works
SPNE 404 Dark Love, Gay Power: Lorca and Almodóvar
SPNE 450 Independent Study

COURSES TAUGHT IN SPANISH (SPAN)
SPAN 101 Beginning Spanish I Designed for students who have not taken Spanish before, this course develops the basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the language, and introduces the student to a variety of cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Beginning Spanish I, as well as the other courses in the beginning and intermediate levels, use a combination of three weekly master classes with the regular instructor and an additional hour of laboratory practice or the equivalent, using the multimedia materials accompanying the text. This course is the first part of the beginning sequence; students who take SPAN 101 in the fall are highly advised to take SPAN 102 in the spring of the same academic year. (Offered every semester)

SPAN 102 Beginning Spanish II The second part of the beginning sequence, this course increases the level of proficiency in the areas of comprehension, speaking, reading and writing, and it provides students with more ample knowledge of the multiple cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Beginning Spanish II, as well as the other courses in the beginning and intermediate levels, use a combination of three weekly master classes with the regular instructor and an additional hour of laboratory practice or the equivalent, using the multimedia materials accompanying the text. Completion of the beginning sequence or its equivalent is necessary for students who wish to advance to the intermediate level. Prerequisite: Span 101 or equivalent. (Offered every semester)

SPAN 121 Intermediate Spanish I This course is designed for students who have been placed in SPAN 121, or students who have completed SPAN 102, or SPAN 110. The course further develops the basic language skills acquired in the beginning sequence through the intensive study of grammatical structures, continued attention to oral and written communication, and an increased emphasis on reading comprehension. Cultural awareness is emphasized through an exposure to authentic materials from the diverse cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Intermediate Spanish I, as well as the other courses in the beginning and intermediate levels, use a combination of three weekly master classes with the regular instructor and an additional hour of laboratory practice or the equivalent, using the multimedia materials accompanying the text. This course is the first part of the intermediate sequence; students who take SPAN 121 are highly advised to take SPAN 122 the following semester. Students who complete the intermediate sequence plus a minimum of one course at the 200-level will meet the language criteria to apply for the department’s off-campus programs in Spain and Cost Rica. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or placement in SPAN 121. (Offered every semester)

SPAN 122 Intermediate Spanish II The second part of the intermediate sequence, this course introduces the student to the more complex aspects of grammar, continues vocabulary build up, and emphasizes oral and written communication through discussion of authentic materials, situation dialogues, and the writing of short essays. Reading materials increase the students' ability to make connections between their own environment and the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Intermediate Spanish II, as well as the other courses in the beginning and intermediate levels, use a combination of three weekly master classes with the regular instructor and an additional hour of laboratory practice or the equivalent, using the multimedia materials accompanying the text. Students who complete the intermediate sequence plus a minimum of one course at the 200-level will meet the language criteria to apply for the department’s off-campus programs in Spain and Costa Rica. Prerequisite: SPAN 21 or placement in SPAN 122. (Offered every semester)

SPAN 203 Spanish for Conversation and Debate This course focuses on the Spanish grammar acquisition process with a particular focus on listening comprehension and speaking. In addition to traditional grammar learning, students will refine their Spanish language skills by practicing oral expression. Aural comprehension, idiomatic usage, fluency, and language use in everyday situations will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 122 or the equivalent. (Travalia, offered annually)

SPAN 225 Hispanic Media: Contemporary Issues This course will develop students' cultural awareness through a series of written assignments organized around major journalistic and academic genres. We will investigate contemporary issues as presented in the media of Spain, Latin America and U.S. Latino communities. More specifically, the course will explore such topics as immigration and multiculturalism, gender and sexuality, linguistic variety of the Spanish language, and issues of cultural identity among others. The Internet, printed, audio and visual media material will provide the foundation for class discussions, oral presentations, cultural projects and other activities. Critical readings will complement the material and provide a broader understanding of contemporary cultural realities on both sides of the Atlantic. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 122 or the equivalent. (Rodríguez-Mansilla, offered alternate years)

SPAN 231 The Art of Translation A situational approach to translation, this course focuses on Spanish in everyday situations. Class activities include role-playing, skits, writing assignments, and translations. Students explore the use of Spanish in fields such as business, health care, social services and education. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary and contrastive analysis of English and Spanish grammar. This course is recommended for bilingual students, students who intend to teach Spanish to English-speakers or English to Spanish-speakers, as well as students who intend to use Spanish in a professional field. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 122, or the equivalent. (Travalia, offered annually)

SPAN 260 Spanish Writing Workshop This course focuses on Spanish grammar and writing. Class activities will examine challenging aspects of Spanish while emphasizing the importance of context. Students will refine their language skills writing different types of compositions, including academic, administrative, journalistic and literary. Reading comprehension and use of idiomatic language are also important aspects of the course. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 122 or the equivalent. (Rodríguez-Mansilla, offered annually)

SPAN 304 Body/Border This course will examine the theme of gender performance and body image in works by Mexican, Hispanic Caribbean, and Latino authors. Class discussions and readings will focus on the ways in which writers in different parts of the Hispanic world (and on different sides of the U.S. national border) confirm, question, and/or transgress social norms regarding gender and the body. Students will use plays, narrative fiction, and essays to study the role of literature, language, and culture in reflecting and reshaping national and transnational attitudes about masculinity and femininity. Course lectures and discussions will reveal how bodily performances and gender norms shift and change as authors, and the characters they create, cross borders, switch languages, and adapt to new cultural surroundings and economic conditions. (Farnsworth, offered occasionally)

SPAN 306 ¡Cómo mola! Introducción a la lingüística española This course is an introduction to Spanish linguistics as applied to current, colloquial language. Students will be introduced to basic concepts of phonetics, syntax, morphology and pragmatics in Spanish. They will analyze examples of these concepts from the Spanish children’s book series, Manolito Gafotas. This popular series is written in modern, idiomatic, Castillian Spanish. It also presents invaluable cultural information about Spain, therefore serving as an authentic, yet accessible corpus of study. One important objective of this course is to enable students to improve their own speaking and writing by enhancing their knowledge of linguistics, as well as its practical applications and cultural implications in everyday Spanish. (Travalia, offered alternate years)

SPAN 308 Culture and Identity in Spanish America This course is a panoramic introduction to the cultures of Mexico, Central and South America, and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. We will investigate the ways in which communities and collective identities have been formed and maintained in Latin America from the time of independence from Spain to the present day. We will also look at the ways in which individuals form their own sense of self within the group context. Topics of discussion will include race, religion, gender, and politics. Course materials will come from current events, historical documents, popular culture, and artwork. Particular attention will be paid to Latin American cinema. Prerequisite: two courses from level II or equivalent. (Staff, offered alternate years)

SPAN 316 Voces de mujeres Voces de mujeres explores the strategies used by modern female writers and artists to express themselves, comment on the condition of women, and foster feminist social change in Spain and Latin America. Class discussions will include issues of race, class, gender, and nation building. Additionally, the course will consider the ways in which female authors challenge traditional literary criticism and re-define terms like "woman," "gender," and "feminist." Prerequisite: two courses from level II or equivalent. (Farnsworth, offered alternate years)

SPAN 317 Arte y Revolución The course consists of an introduction to some of the main literary figures on Latin America through a period of roughly 50 years (1930-1980). The emphasis will fall on the comparison of literary genres (novel, short story, theater, poetry), delving into each genre's particular devices, strategies and rhetoric. A study of the painting of Frida Kahlo and some songs of Salsa and the Nueva Canción Latinoamericana, will help highlight differences between literary media. This is a period of great ideological effervescence in Latin America, where the function of art in a revolutionary context is often debated, as well as the function of the revolutionary in the arts. Students sharpen their critical and communicative skills through oral and written responses to texts. (Paiewonsky-Conde, offered alternate years)

SPAN 318 La España del Siglo de Oro This course focuses on the cultural production of imperial Spain with an emphasis on the 16th century in Spain and the Renaissance period while making connections with colonial literature in Spanish America. This course provides the student with a historical, artistic, as well as ideological background to understand the early modern era of the Spanish-speaking world and its main cultural expressions. In that way, it contributes to the education of the student through the study of concepts, trends, and discourses that pervade Hispanic literature and culture across different times and spaces. The course could serve as a helpful introduction to the subject of SPAN 410, a course that deals in depth with the Spanish Golden Age, with an emphasis on the 17th century, characterized as the Baroque era. (Rodríguez-Mansilla, offered alternate years)

SPAN 321 Cuentos de América Latina Against a background of contemporary theory on the genre, the course examines this ancestral drive to tell a story in its multifaceted manifestation in Latin America. Moving from the forms of the oral tradition (anécdota, chiste, cuento popular) to the popularly rooted stories of Bosch, Rulfo and Allende, to the metaphysical games of Borges and Cortázar, and from the Amazon to the urban centers, from the Andes to the Caribbean, the course ends with an examination of the multi functionality of feminine voices in the present generation of women storytellers. Students sharpen their receptivity as listeners and readers as well as exercise their skills as inventors and narrators. Prerequisite: two courses from level II or equivalent. (Paiewonsky-Conde, offered alternate years)

SPAN 332 Literatura infantil This course is an introduction to the rich tradition of children's literature in Spanish. Students will examine literary works from various Spanish-speaking countries, including Latino writers from the US, and time periods, paying particular attention to the colloquial language and cultural elements of each text. Consideration will be given to the young characters' view of the world and how issues like class, gender and identity influence that view. In addition to analyzing literary works, students will have the opportunity to write their own children's story in Spanish. Moreover, students will work on literary projects that engage the Spanish-speaking community in Geneva, especially the youth. This course is highly recommended for students interested in bilingual education, community outreach, and/or creative writing. Prerequisite: two courses from level III or equivalent. (Travalia, offered alternate years)

SPAN 336 Spain: the Making of a Nation This course takes an approach to the development of contemporary Spain and Spanish national identities in the context of Western civilization. It studies and discusses historical background, economic and political patterns, literary and artistic development (Cervantes, Velázquez, Goya, Picasso), as well as cultural traditions and folklore. Some of the issues the course addresses are: Jews, Muslims, and Christians, imperial Spain and the psychology of conquest, the myth of Don Juan, and the Gypsy paradox. Prerequisite: two courses from level II or equivalent. (Liébana, offered alternate years)

SPAN 340 Spanish Cinema In this course we will study the production of a selected group of Spanish filmmakers from Buñuel to the present. Through film screenings, class discussions, and readings on film theory, film history, and Spanish culture, we will trace the evolution of Spanish cinema through Franco’s military dictatorship and under the new democratic system. Themes of exile and censorship, gender and sexuality, religion and nationality, among others, will be explored in the context of film history, Spanish society, and in relation to other artistic manifestations of Spanish culture. By the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of contemporary Spanish history as represented in its cinema, as well as an understanding of a variety of themes that are both unique to Spanish society and universal to the human condition. (Liébana, offered alternate years)

SPAN 344 Rutas literarias de España This course focuses on key moments in the development of Spanish Peninsular Literature from the Middle Ages to the (post) modern period. Through the analysis of poems, short stories, essays and other historical and experimental genres, this class seeks to explain and exemplify essential themes of the Spanish literary tradition: race and ethnicity, nation, Empire, and foreign influence, cultural customs and the appraisal of modernity, gender issues and the reflection on literature, individuality and artistic language. Prerequisite: two courses from level II or equivalent. (Rodríguez-Mansilla, offered alternate years)

SPAN 345 Latin American Literary Frontiers This is a survey of Latin American literature from the conquest to the twentieth century. The course covers a broad range of literary developments in Latin America including ancient indigenous literature and colonial chronicles, texts from the era of independence and romanticism, modernist and avant-garde poetry, and contemporary theatre and narrative. Class discussions examine the general characteristics of major literary movements as well as the particular cultural, social, and political messages of each text. Prerequisite: two courses from level II or equivalent. (Staff, offered occasionally)

SPAN 355 Contemporary Theater: Innovations in Hispanic Drama This class will examine theater from Latin America, Spain, and the Latino population in the US. We will study the diverse methods that playwrights in these regions have developed to reflect and to critique the political and social climates in which they live; we will also discuss the role that theater plays in community-building, identity politics, and political activism. Dramatic practices such as metatheater, theater of cruelty, Brechtian techniques, and feminist drama will be discussed throughout the semester. Prerequisites: Prerequisite: two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Farnsworth, offered occasionally)

SPAN 360 Special Topics: Hispanic Studies This course examines the Spanish contribution to the historical development of the notion of melancholia within Western culture and thought.  Starting with a question that is more than two thousand years old, "Why are all great people melancholy?", this course investigates the interrelation between sadness, anxiety and creativity on the literary and philosophical level, while taking into account the heterogeneous historical, cultural and political background of this nexus.  A reading list combining historical, theoretical and critical texts will supply an introduction to the complex development of the notion of melancholia from Spanish perspective.  Prerequisite: Two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Staff)

SPAN 361 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature A chronological study of selected masterpieces of the Peninsula from their genesis in the Middle Ages to the present with an emphasis on the historical, political, and sociological factors that have shaped Spanish culture and society. An appreciation of the essential features of different literary periods (e.g., Renaissance, Baroque, Romanticism) and of correspondences to other artistic media. Prerequisites: Two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Liébana, offered occasionally)

SPAN 362 Two Wars, Two Generations From the Spanish American War (1898) to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) there was a period of extraordinary literary and artistic production, often recognized as a second Golden Age in Spanish cultural history. Literature and philosophy, art and cinema, gave Spain some of its most prominent international figures, such as Unamuno, Baroja, García Lorca, Buñuel and Dalí. This course will examine the socio historical conditions that gave birth to the Generations of 1898 and 1927 with particular emphasis on the experimental literary and artistic movements of the time, such as symbolism, impressionism and surrealism. Prerequisite: two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Liébana, offered alternate years)

SPAN 365 Literature and Music of the Hispanic Caribbean This course is an introduction to the cultural history of Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico through the analysis of some of the main features of the literature and music of the region. Students investigate how these two expressive modalities delve into issues of gender roles, racial relations, identity (insularity, hybridity), economic dependence, religious syncretism, and a characteristic sense of humor. The study shows literature has self-consciously drawn on the oral traditions while music spontaneously draws on the written word, imitating and complementing life and each other. Prerequisite: two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Paiewonsky-Conde, offered alternate years)

SPAN 372 Contemporary Spanish Novel A study of a selection of novels that have been made into film, the course focuses on some of the major authors writing during the Franco regime (1939-1975), and the new generation of novelists and filmmakers who are writing and making films in democratic Spain. Such topics as the trauma of the Civil War, censorship and creative freedom, motherhood in the time of war, and the politics of family and love in a Catholic state, are addressed. Prerequisites: Two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Liébana, offered occasionally)

SPAN 374 In the Shadow of Dulcinea This course examines the complex social, literary and philosophical aspects that underlie the ideology of love developed in Spanish literature during the Late Middle Ages and Early Modernity. Through intensive textual readings students approach conventional as well as subversive models of love and lovers, along with issues in gender identity, female literacy, and politics of sexuality. The analysis of gender relationships uncovers the taboos and the repressed aspects of the Early Modern culture and the self. Prerequisite: two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Rodríguez-Mansilla, offered alternate years)

SPAN 385 Sounds of Spanish This course takes students one step further in their study of the Spanish language with an introduction to the mechanics of native sound production. Non-native speakers will work with native speakers toward achieving a native-like pronunciation. Both groups of students will develop an awareness of the phonetic variation that exists in the Spanish-speaking world today. Emphasis will be placed on historical factors involved in the development of different phonetic variants, as well as the social advantages and disadvantages that characterize them. Other differences between varieties of Spanish will also be examined, such as morfosyntactical, semantic and pragmatic aspects. Prerequisite: two SPAN courses from level II or the equivalent. (Travalia, offered alternate years)

SPAN 392 Latin American Women’s Writings This course encompasses one or more topics concerning female experience as represented in texts written by women in Latin America. Class themes and discussions center on issues such as women as writers, the female body and violence, women and power, women as agents of history, or female voice/female silence. Prerequisite: two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Farnsworth, offered occasionally)

SPAN 410 Spanish Golden Age: Renaissance and Baroque This course analyzes major works of Spain's most influential literary and cultural period (1492-1700). It focuses on topics that have become foundational to modernity such as the relation of author and authority, self-fashioning and orthodoxy, perspectivism and ethnocentrism, religious thought and secular power. This class will examine the literary texts in the larger context of Renaissance culture, and explore their interrelations with history, philosophy and art, and their preceding Italian and contemporary Elizabethan counterparts. Prerequisite: two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Rodríguez-Mansilla, offered alternate years)

SPAN 420 Contemporary Latin American Novel This course focuses on reading and discussion of major works by the generation of Latin-American writers known as the Latin American "boom" and important precursors. Consideration will be given to the political factors that inform the ideological premises of these writers. Prerequisite: two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Paiewonsky-Conde, offered every three years)

SPAN 450 Independent Study

SPAN 490 Cervantes: Don Quixote This course offers careful analysis of the style, characterization, theme, and structure of Spain's greatest literary masterpiece, and study of the work's relationship to major social and intellectual currents of the 16th and 17th centuries. Prerequisite: Two courses from level III or the equivalent. (Paiewonsky-Conde, offered occasionally)

SPAN 495 Honors

COURSES TAUGHT IN ENGLISH (SPNE and BIDS)
SPNE 226 Screen Latinos In this course, students learn to identify Latino stereotypes in the media (primarily film and television), trace the history of such stereotypes and show how these stereotypes have been repackaged for contemporary audiences. More important, students examine how Latinos have used media, including New Media, to counteract the stereotypes and fashion images that spring from their specific identities as Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Dominicans, Cubans, etc., and yet acknowledge their shared culture as "Latinos." To this end, students encounter a variety of "media objects," including literature, film, television, murals, new media (web installations) and performance art (groups such as Culture Clash). (Jimenez, offered alternate years)

SPNE 308 Latin American/Latino Cinema This course focuses on the major Latin American and Latino filmmakers in an attempt to understand the historical development and political role of film in the Latin American context. The developing major film centers in Latin America are reviewed, including Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba; the developing cinema of Puerto Rico, Chicano and other Latino groups in the United States is also considered. Directors include Sanjinés, Alea, Littin, Gomez, Rocha. (Staff, offered occasionally)

SPNE 311 The Latino Experience This course offers an overview of the experience of Latinos in the United States through selected literary texts and films. Topics to be covered in selected works include: from the barrio to Atzlan, place and origin in Latino consciousness; bilingualism, its promise and betrayal; hustling and the American dream, modes of economic survival; the Latina experience, outgrowing martyrdom; Latino myth-ecology, nature and the supernatural. (Jiménez, offered alternate years)

SPNE 322 Theater and Social Change in Latin America This course will study the relationship between political movements, social justice and theater in Latin America. We will discuss the ways in which Latin American dramatists have used the stage to rehearse revolutionary ideas, criticize political corruption, and rally support for political movements. Topics of discussion will include revolutionary uprisings, the search for the disappeared, feminism, racial and cultural inclusion, liberation theology, and the rights of sexual minorities. Students may take part in theatre sketches during the semester. Prerequisites: Open to all. (Farnsworth, offered alternate years)

SPNE 325 Special Topics: Hispanic Studies

SPNE 345 The Paradoxes of Fiction: Latin American Contemporary Narrative This course examines some of the most representative works by the generation of Latin American literary giants known as the "Boom." This is a fiction that lays bare the paradoxes at the very core of fiction: exposing the double-sidedness of boundaries, turning life inside out and death outside in, dismantling the construction of subjectivity, and constantly assaulting and reconstructing the reader's own identity. And yet for all this, the reader is always caught in the very dense web of socio historical conditions (and at times gruesome political reality) of Latin America. It is, therefore, a literature responsive to the whole of human experience. Prerequisite: Open to all; recommended for sophomores and above. (Paiewonsky-Conde, offered alternate years)

SPNE 355 García Márquez: The Major Works One of the most distinguished figures of the Latin American literary landscape and of 20th century global literature, García Márquez's work cuts across socio-historic, psychological, metaphysical and aesthetic dimensions to give the reader a true compendium of reality. Against a background of theoretical readings on magical realism, we will examine his masterpiece, One Hundred Years of Solitude, widely considered as the most influential Latin American novel. The context of ideological controversy, in an area where culture is highly charged politically, will be examined. We will also focus on particular problems of translation, highlighting significant differences between the two languages. We will consider the network of popular culture (folkloric tales, "ballenato" music) of the Caribbean coast of Colombia, which is at the root of Márquez's writing. Other readings include: Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The Autumn of the Patriarch, Love in the Time of Cholera, Of Love and Other Demons, and the biographical-critical interviews conducted by Apuleyo Mendoza in The Smell of Guava. Prerequisites: Open to all; recommended for sophomores or above. (Paiewonsky-Conde, offered alternate years)

SPNE 404 Dark Love, Gay Power: Lorca and Almodóvar In the decades since the end of Franco´s dictatorship, Spain has undergone a major sociopolitical transformation in its treatment of homosexuality. Lorca, murdered by fascist forces in 1936, is still buried in a nameless grave, and his "Sonnets of Dark Love" (homoerotic love) were not published until 1983. Almodóvar, whose "Law of Desire" made him an international icon of gay cinema, continues to be hailed as the leader of his generation. This course will examine Lorca's theater and poetry alongside Almodóvar's work. Class discussions will trace the thematic connections between the two authors (freedom and oppression, gender and sexuality, love and desire, among other themes) in the larger context of the human experience. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status. (Liébana, offered alternate years)

SPNE 450 Independent Study

BIDS 286 Gender, Nation, Literature This course examines the relationship between gender and national cultures in Latin America, from Independence to World War II (c. 1825-1945). As Latin American nations broke from Spanish colonial rule, state-builders confronted the colonial past and set out to forge new national identities and cultures. Specifically, state-builders sought to construct social citizenship and fashion national cultures in societies still asymmetrically ordered on the basis of the exclusionary colonial criterion of gender, ethnicity, class, and geography. Popular works of literature frequently cast the desire to reconcile the colonial order and assert modern nationalist identities in gendered terms. In particular, the critical problems of state formation in Latin America—the hope and anxiety associated with post-colonial instability; socioeconomic equality, ethnic unity, and spatial consolidation; the quest for modernity; and the assertion of sovereignty and authenticity—often took on erotic overtones. Unrequited love, sexual union, and marriage became central metaphors for understanding (and naturalizing) national consolidation, and establishing the new hegemonic order. By tracing out the "national romances" of Latin America, we can learn much about the role of gender (writ large) in Latin American State formation, and the position of women in the region's post-colonial order. As such, this course will offer students parallel histories of the changing role of women in Latin American culture and literature and the role of gender in the Latin American political imagination. (Farnsworth and Ristow, offered alternate years)