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2012-2014 COURSE CATALOGUE : SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES

Social Justice Studies constitute an interdisciplinary inquiry into the social, cultural, and institutional responses to inequality and oppression. Social Justice Studies examine the institutional structures, cultural practices, and social behaviors that inform the concept of equality and the recognition of human rights. The program draws on an array of courses from across the curriculum to facilitate the understanding of historical and contemporary representations of social justice.

This program provides a rigorous intellectual experience for students through a structure that includes: (a) foundational courses in theory and history; (b) a set of courses chosen from across the disciplines, constructed to provide a unifying examination of core themes; (c) practical experiences in social activism; and (d) a capstone experience – an internship, independent study, teaching practicum, or honors thesis. Our goal is that students in the social justice studies program:

  • Develop a significant grounding in historical and contemporary social movements from which to understand the roots, evolution, and complexity of social justice.
  • Develop an understanding of systems, institutions, and policy in relation to social justice and equity.
  • Develop an ethical awareness of the impact of systems, institutions, and policy on individuals, cultural norms, and human rights.

Two minors are supported by the Social Justice Studies curriculum: (a) Social Justice Studies, and (b) Civic Engagement and Social Justice.

ADVISING
Students declaring a social justice minor must select an academic adviser from among the professors on the Steering Committee (Neeta Bhasin, Donna Davenport, Kendralin Freeman, Jack Harris, Khuram Hussain, Mary Kelly, Colby Ristow). Advisers will ensure that students who minor in Social Justice Studies and Civic Engagement and Social Justice select at least two courses in their minor that together provide in depth study of social justice theory in one academic program or department.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR in Social Justice Studies
6 courses, interdisciplinary
Six courses: SJSP 100, Foundations of Social Justice; one course in Theoretical Perspectives from the list below or chosen in consultation with an academic adviser from the Steering Committee; one course within each theme from the list below, or chosen in consultation with an academic adviser from the Steering Committee; and a credited practicum capstone experience, designed/selected in consultation with an adviser. At least two of the four theme courses must be at the 300-level or above. A recommended course for the practicum is PHIL 162, Ethics of Civic Engagement (SLC).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR in Civic Engagement and Social Justice
6 courses, interdisciplinary
Six courses: SJSP 100, Foundations of Social Justice; one course in Theoretical Perspectives from the list below or chosen in consultation with an academic adviser from the Steering Committee; SJSP 101, Community Based Research: Introduction to the Scholarship of Engagement; two courses from more than one discipline with the SLC/CBR designation (service learning/community based research); and one seminar with community-based research or a Geneva Collaborative Internship.

General Core: Theoretical Perspectives
Students must examine the theoretical underpinnings of the field and the range of methodologies involved in (a) critically responding to theory-based questions, and (b) application of theory and research in the practice of social justice. Typically, this is not an introductory survey course.

Examples include:
EDUC 307 Civil Rights Education
EDUC 370 Social Foundations of Multiculturalism
PHIL 315 Social Justice
PPOL 101 Democracy and Public Policy
POL 140 Introduction to Comparative Politics
SOC 223 Inequalities
SOC 228 Social Conflict

Theme 1: Social Movements
The goals of Theme 1 are to develop a significant grounding in historical and contemporary social movements from which to understand the roots, evolution, and complexity of social justice and to develop an ethical awareness of the impact on individuals, cultural norms, and human rights.

AFS 150 Foundations of Africana Studies
AFS 430 Films of Spike Lee
ANTH 211 Power, Protest, & Politics
ECON 203 Collective Bargaining
EDUC 201 Schooling and Social Equality
EDUC 252 History of Disability
EDUC 307 Civil Rights Education
EDUC 370 Social Foundations of Multiculturalism
EDUC 377 Diversity and Education in NZ and the US
FRE 241 Prises de Vues – Introduction to Contemporary France
FRE 242 Quebec Studies: Culture and Identity in Quebec
HIST 301 The Enlightenment
HIST 317 Women and Social Movements
HIST 396 The Fate of Socialism
PHIL 152 Philosophy and Feminism
POL 249 Protests, Movements, and Unions
POL 279 Radical Thought from Karl Marx to George W. Bush
POL 215 Racial and Ethnic Politics
POL 258 Comparative Politics of the Middle East
POL 285 International Politics of the Middle East
POL 312 Politics Reform in the Middle East
REL 238 Liberating Theology
SOC 222 Social Change
SOC 259 Sociology of Social Movements: Fight for Your Rights!
WRRH 206 Immigrant Experiences: Voices and Discourses
WRRH 252 An Anatomy of Class (not offered until 2014)

Theme 2: Power and Identity
The goals of Theme 2 are to develop a mastery of key concepts (such as prejudice, privilege, oppression, liberation, justice, equity, and equality) in their multiple manifestations across the disciplines and to develop an understanding of positionality (individual, cultural, and institutional).

AFS 150 Foundations of Africana Studies
AFS 200 Ghettoscapes
AFS 211 Black Earth
AFS 430 Films of Spike Lee
ANTH 205 Race, Class, & Ethnicity
ANTH 211 Power, Protest, and Politics
ANTH 220 Sex Roles
ECON 243 Political Economy of Race
ECON 310 Economics and Gender
EDUC 201 Schooling and Social Equality
EDUC 203 Children with Disabilities
EDUC 221 Understanding Autism
EDUC 252 History of Disability
EDUC 270 Social Class, Consumption and Education
EDUC 307 Civil Rights Education
EDUC 336 Topic: Transition and Disability: Life after High School
EDUC 336 Topic: Self-Determination in Special Education
EDUC 370 Social Foundations of Multiculturalism
EDUC 377 Diversity and Education in NZ and the US
ENG 381 Sexuality and American literature
FRNE 218 Memory, Culture and Identity in French Caribbean Literatures –
FRNE 219 Maghreb Literature in Cinema
FRE 241 Prises de Vues – Introduction to Contemporary France
FRE 242 Quebec Studies: Culture and Identity in Quebec
FRE 252 Intro’ to Literature II: Que sais je?
FRE 253 Intro’ to Literature III: Paris Outer-mer
FRE 384 Topics in XVIIth and XVIIIth Centuries
FRE 385 Topics in XIXth and XXth Century
FRNE 395 Race, Society and Culture of the Ancien Regime
[FRE are courses in French and Francophone Studies; FRNE are courses that are taught in English.]
HIST 301 The Enlightenment
MDSC 303 Social Documentary
PHIL 155 The Morality of War
PHIL 159 Global Justice
PHIL 232 Liberty and Community
PHIL 234 Theories of Right and Wrong
PHIL 235 Morality and Self-Interest
PHIL 250 Feminism: Ethics and Knowledge
PHIL 345 Power, Privilege, and Knowledge
POL 215 Racial and Ethnic Politics
POL 254 Globalization
POL 297 Europe and America
POL 265 Modern Political Theory
PPOL 219 Sexual Minority Movts and Public Policy
PPOL 364 Social Policy and Community Activism
REL 238 Liberating Theology
SOC 221 Race and Ethnic Relations
SOC 224 Social Deviance
SOC 226 Sex and Gender
SOC 356 Power & Powerlessness
WRRH 206 Immigrant Experiences: Voices and Discourses
WRRH 208 The Other Englishes
WRRH 220 Bread Winners and Losers (not offered until 2014)
WRRH 221 He Says, She Says
WRRH 250 Talk and Text: Intro to Discourse Analysis
WRRH 251 Black Talk, White Talk
WRRH 252 An Anatomy of Class (not offered until 2014)
WRRH 301 Discourses of Rape
WRRH 309 Talk and Text II: Language in Action

Theme 3: Institutions and Policy
The goal of Theme 3 is to understand systems, institutions, and policy in relation to social justice and equity.

AFS 430 Films of Spike Lee
ANTH 3/440 Anthropology of the Global Commons
ANTH 280 Environment & Culture
ECON 203 Collective Bargaining
ECON 243 Political Economy of Race
ENV 205 Environmental Law
EDUC 201 Schooling and Social Equality
EDUC 203 Children with Disabilities
EDUC 221 Understanding Autism
EDUC 252 History of Disability
EDUC 270 Social Class, Consumption and Education
EDUC 302 Disability in China
EDUC 307 Civil Rights Education
EDUC 332 Disability, Family, and Society
EDUC 336 Transition and Disability: Life after High School
EDUC 336 Self-Determination in Special Education
EDUC 370 Social Foundations of Multiculturalism
EDUC 377 Diversity and Education in NZ and the US
HIST 151 History of the World Food System
HIST 327 U.S. Intervention in Central America
PHIL 151 Crime and Punishment
PHIL 156 Biomedical Ethics
PHIL 236 Philosophy of Law
POL 257 Russia/China Resurgent
POL 236 Urban Politics
PPOL 219 Sexual Minority Movts and Public Policy
PPOL 328 Environmental Policy
PPOL 364 Social Policy and Community Activism
SOC 258 Social Problems
SOC 262 Criminology
SOC 263 Juvenile Delinquency
SOC 375 Social Policy

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SJSP 100 Foundations of Social Justice provides an introduction to the foundational principles and theories of social justice, for the Social Justice Studies minor and the minor in Civic Engagement and Social Justice. It is intended to cut across the three themes that comprise the minor: Social Movements, Power and Identity, and Institutions and Policy.
Students will be introduced to key concepts, methodologies, and competencies connected to the field of social justice studies. Students will engage with this material by examining:

  • theories and research on socialization that inform the development of social identity and social group affiliations within social institutions;
  • prejudice and discrimination, the dynamics of power and privilege, and interlocking systems of oppression;
  • forms of resistance and processes of empowerment and liberation created by individuals, families, and communities, and implemented within social systems;
  • socio-cultural, historical and legal contexts for the emergence, recognition, and interpretation of human rights, and the social liberation movements that found inspiration therein (such as civil rights movements, the women's liberation movement, indigenous rights movements, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender rights movements, and environmental justice movements);
  • how intersectional dynamics between race, class and gender inform social movements; and
  • introduction to social justice intervention strategies such as conflict resolution, collaboration, and advocacy.

SJSP 101 Community-Based Research: Introduction to the Scholarship of Engagement provides students with the research methods and tools needed to engage in effective community-based research (CBR) and offers a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the demography and history of Geneva and surrounding areas. Among the topics covered are the ethical and legal questions relevant to community-based research; methodologies for planning and implementing a CBR project; building relationships with community partners; and media for communication to and for the community.