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COURSE CATALOGUE : ART AND ARCHITECTURE

The Department of Art and Architecture offers three independent but strongly integrated areas of study: studio art, art history, and architectural studies. Studio art and art history offer majors and minors; architectural studies offers a major only.

The department provides students with the opportunity to delve deeply into visual culture and the built environment. Broadly speaking, students study the role of art and architecture in shaping, embodying, and interpreting human experience. Some students may focus on creative discovery and expression or the design process, with the opportunity to explore perceptual and conceptual problem solving. Others may study formal analysis and research methods within an interdisciplinary approach to understanding historical context. All of our students are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities to study studio art, art history, and architecture and design on semester abroad programs, to do internships in the field, and to do independent work at an advanced level. All three areas of study are designed to prepare students for continued education at the graduate school level.

In art history, students choose from an array of courses covering all periods of the art and architecture of America, Europe, Asia, North Africa, and the Islamic world. Advanced courses focus more intensively on specific disciplinary and interdisciplinary issues: artistic practice and patronage, the history of an important movement, gender in art, texts and images, historiography and theory, and exhibit planning and design. Art history students learn how to analyze visual culture and become adept at writing, research, and critical thinking, making them well prepared for graduate study and a variety of careers that require these skills. Coursework in programs such as Media and Society, European Studies, Asian Studies, Women’s Studies, Aesthetics, English, Comparative Literature, Philosophy, Religious Studies, History, Anthropology, Economics, and Sociology complements the study of art history.

In studio art, students study painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and imaging (photography, video, and new media). The major begins with rigorous introductory courses and quickly moves on to more focused intermediate and advanced offerings. Studio art courses at all levels are designed to help each student to explore a broad range of concepts, methods, and materials while developing individual ideas and a personal voice. Consistent throughout the studio art experience is attention to craft, development of a refined understanding of formal relationships, exercise of a rigorous practice of art making, and exposure to a broad range of historical and contemporary examples. As part of a liberal arts education, studio art is one of the few places where students can creatively engage in the development of a visual language, and this study prepares them for further study in graduate programs as well as a wide range of careers. Students often enrich their interests in studio arts with both similar and dissimilar majors and minors, including Arts and Education, Economics, Architectural Studies, Writing and Rhetoric, Media and Society, and many more.

In architectural studies, students pursue a rigorous multi-disciplinary, holistic approach to design education embracing a liberal arts philosophy, based on the belief that roundly educated individuals make the best architects. Interdisciplinary coursework informs students about the complex relationship between environmental sustainability and human habitation. Students become visual communicators, creative problem solvers, non-linear thinkers, and collaborative learners. The architectural studies major prepares graduates to enter a number of different fields in design, including architecture, landscape architecture, product design, urban design, interior design, and historic preservation. Our students minor and double major in a range of areas across the Colleges to complement their career choices in programs such as environmental studies, urban studies, art history, philosophy and a host of other areas.

Students are encouraged to pursue study abroad opportunities for one or two semesters during their junior or senior years. Courses offered on these programs can supplement or be substituted for program requirements. Professors from the department frequently lead semesters abroad in Rome, Italy. Majors are also encouraged to study in Aix-en-Provence, France; Carmarthen, Wales; Bath and Norwich, England; Hikone, Japan; Beijing and Nanjing, China; Taipei, Taiwan; Vietnam; and India. Architectural studies majors can pursue design studio-based programs in Berlin, Germany; Copenhagen, Denmark; and Lingnan, Hong Kong.

Students in all areas have the opportunity to culminate their undergraduate careers with a highly rewarding honors program. The honors program consists of a yearlong course of study, which is developed and pursued in close collaboration with a faculty mentor.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ART HISTORY MAJOR (B.A.)
disciplinary, 12 courses
Two courses from ARTH 101, ARTH 102, ARTH 103, or ARTH 110; at the 200-level or higher, one course in ancient or medieval art, one course in Asian art, one course in Renaissance or Baroque art, one course in American or modern art, a 300-level course, a 400-level capstone course, two art history electives, and two studio art courses. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the major.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ART HISTORY MINOR
disciplinary, 6 courses
ARTH 101, ARTH 102, ARTH 103, or ARTH 110; one studio art course; and four additional art history courses. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the minor.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE STUDIO ART MAJOR (B.A.)
disciplinary, 12 courses
Three 100-level courses representing three different groups from the following choices: ARTS 105; ARTS 114 or 115; ARTS 125; and ARTS 165 or 166; four 200-level studio art courses; two 300-level studio art courses; a seminar; and two art history courses. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the major.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE STUDIO ART MINOR
disciplinary, 6 courses
Two 100-level courses representing two different groups from the following choices: ARTS 105; ARTS 114 or 115; ARTS 125; and ARTS 165 or 166; two 200- or 300-level studio art courses; one art history course; and one additional studio art course. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the minor.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES MAJOR (B.A.) (no minor offered)
interdisciplinary, 14 courses  
One Introduction to Architectural Studies course; two 100-level studio art courses, ARTS 125 and either ARTS 115 or 114; three architectural history and theory courses; two architecture design studios, ARCS 200 and a 300-level studio course; two courses concerning issues in urban studies, environmental studies, or sustainability; one history course; two electives at the 200-level or higher (other than Math/Physics, which may be taken at the 100-level) selected in consultation with an adviser in the program; and one 400-level capstone experience to be satisfied by one of the following courses: ARCS 405 Portfolio Design, ARCH 412 Social Construction of Space, ARCS 400 Advanced Design Studio, ARCH/ARCS 450 Independent Study (must secure faculty adviser) and participation in the Senior Symposium, or ARCH 495 Honors Project in Architectural Studies (must apply to Architectural Studies Program for consideration) and participation in Senior Symposium. All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Credit/no credit courses cannot be counted towards the major.

COURSE CONCENTRATIONS
Art History
ARTH 100 Issues in Art
ARTH 101 Introduction to Art: Ancient and Medieval
ARTH 102 Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance through Modern
ARTH 103 Introduction to Asian Art
ARTH 110 Visual Culture
ARTH 201 African American Art
ARTH 202 Art Internship: Catalog
ARTH 203 Art Internship: Exhibition
ARTH 204 Art Internship: Acquisition
ARTH 208 Greek Art and Architecture
ARTH 210 Woman as Image and Image-Maker
ARTH 211 Women and the Visual Arts in 19th Century Europe
ARTH 218 Gothic Art and Architecture
ARTH 221 Early Italian Renaissance Painting
ARTH 224 Renaissance Sculpture
ARTH 226 Northern Renaissance Art
ARTH 229 Women and Art in the Middle Ages
ARTH 230 The Age of Michelangelo
ARTH 232 Rococo Art and Architecture
ARTH 233 Renaissance Architecture
ARTH 235 Art and Architecture of Baroque Rome
ARTH 237 Princely Art: Renaissance Court Art and Culture of Mantua, Milan, Ferrara and Rome
ARTH 240 European Painting in the 19th Century
ARTH 248 Love and Death in Ancient Egypt
ARTH 249 Islamic Art and Architecture
ARTH 250 Modern Art 1900-1960
ARTH 252 Japanese Art and Culture
ARTH 253 Buddhist Art and Architecture
ARTH 254 Islamic Art at the Crossroads: the Western Mediterranean 12th to 16th Century
ARTH 255 French Roots of Modernism
ARTH 259 Chinese Painting, Tang to Yuan Dynasties
ARTH 270 Early Medieval Art
ARTH 272 Chinese Pictures, Ming Dynasty to Modern
ARTH 282 20th Century American Art
ARTH 300 Michelangelo, Caravaggio and Bernini
ARTH 303/403 Gender and Painting in China
ARTH 305/405 Women and Men: Gender Construction in Renaissance Italy
ARTH 306/406 Telling Tales: Narrative in Asian Art
ARTH 307 Cultural Theory and Art History
ARTH 315/415 Art and the Senses: High Renaissance Art and Arch in Venice in 15th and 16th Century
ARTH 332/432 Roman Art, Architecture, and Power
ARTH 333/433 Art Since 1960
ARTH 334/434 Manet and the Modernist Project
ARTH 335 Femme Fatale and Film
ARTH 336/436 Arts of the Landscape and the Garden in China and Japan
ARTH 340 American Architecture to 1900
ARTH 389 Rococo to Revolution: Painting in France 1760-1800
ARTH 401 Seminar: Art Historiography – the History of Art History
ARTH 402 Seminar: Design After Modernism
ARTH 410 The Genre of the Female Nude in 19C European Art
ARTH 450 Independent Study
ARTH 480 Seminar: Art of the Pilgrimage Roads
ARTH 495 Honors

Studio Art
ARTS 105 Color and Composition
ARTS 114 Introduction to Sculpture
ARTS 115 Three-Dimensional Design
ARTS 125 Introduction to Drawing
ARTS 165 Introduction to Imaging
ARTS 166 Intro to Video I: Creating Art with Moving Images
ARTS 203 Representational Painting
ARTS 204 Abstract Painting
ARTS 207 Image Exploration in Photography and Printmaking
ARTS 209 Watercolor
ARTS 214 Metal Sculpture
ARTS 215 Sculpture Modeling
ARTS 225 Life Drawing
ARTS 227 Advanced Drawing
ARTS 245 Photo Silkscreen Printing
ARTS 246 Intaglio Printing
ARTS 248 Woodcut Printing
ARTS 265 Intermediate Imaging
ARTS 266 Intermediate Video II
ARTS 305 Painting Workshop
ARTS 315 Sculpture Workshop
ARTS 345 Printmaking Workshop
ARTS 365 Imaging Workshop
ARTS 450 Independent Study
ARTS 480 Studio Art Senior Seminar: Theory and Practice
ARTS 495 Honors

Architectural Studies
Required courses
ARCH 110 Introduction to Architectural Studies
ARCS 200 Introduction to Architectural Design I
ARCS 300 Introduction to Architectural Design II (or other approved 300-level ARCS course)
ARTS 115 Three-Dimensional Design or ARTS 114 Introduction to Sculpture
ARTS 125 Introduction to Drawing

Architecture history/theory elective choices
ARCH 204 Introduction to Historical Preservation
ARCH 305 Environmental Design, Planning and Preservation
ARCH 310 Early Modern Architecture
ARCH 311 History of Modern Architecture
ARCH 312 Theories of Modern Architecture and Urbanism
ARCH 313 History of Modern Landscape Architecture
ARCH 412 Social Construction of Space
ARTH 208 Greek Art and Architecture
ARTH 218 Gothic Art and Architecture
ARTH 232 Rococo Art and Architecture
ARTH 233 Renaissance Architecture
ARTH 235 Art and Architecture of Baroque Rome
ARTH 249 Islamic Art and Architecture
ARTH 250 Modern Art 1900-1960
ARTH 252 Japanese Art and Culture
ARTH 253 Buddhist Art and Architecture
ARTH 255 French Roots of Modernism
ARTH 270 Early Medieval Art
ARTH 332/432 Roman Art, Architecture, and Power
ARTH 333/433 Art Since 1960
ARTH 336/436 Arts of the Landscape and the Garden in China and Japan
ARTH 480 Seminar: Art of the Pilgrimage Roads

Architecture studio elective choices
ARCS 202 Watercolor Sketching
ARCS 303 Visual Notes and Analysis: Designer's Sketchbook
ARCS 400 Advanced Architecture Studio
ARCS 405 Senior Seminar: Arch Portfolio Design

Urban Studies, Environmental Design and Sustainability elective choices
AMST 210 Sex and the City
ANTH 206 Early Cities
ANTH 247 Urban Anthropology
ANTH 326 Meso-American Urbanism
ARCH 305 Environmental Design, Planning and Preservation
ARCH 313 History of Modern Landscape Architecture
ARCH 351 Sustainable Community Development Methods
BIDS 229 Two Cities: New York and Toronto
BIDS 298 The Ballets Russes
ECON 212 Environmental Economics
ECON 213 Urban Economics
ECON 344 Economic Planning Development
ENV 110 Topics in Environmental Studies
ENV 205 Introduction to Environmental Law
GEO 140 Introduction to Environmental Geology
GEO 182 Introduction to Meteorology
GEO 184 Introduction to Geology
HIST 215 American Urban History
HIST 246 American Environmental History
HIST 264 Modern European City
HIST 341 Beyond Sprawl
PHIL 154 Environmental Ethics
REL 226 Religion and Nature
SOC 249 Technology and Society
SOC 251 Sociology of the City
SOC 253 World Cities
SOC 271 Sociology of Environmental Issues
SOC 290 Sociology of Community

History elective choices
(any course taught in the History Department may count toward this requirement; listed below are courses at the 100 and 200 level only; refer to History Department for further listings)
HIST 101 Foundations of European Society
HIST 102 Making of the Modern World
HIST 103 Early Modern Europe
HIST 105 Introduction to the American Experience
HIST 111 Topics in Introductory American History
HIST 151 Food Systems in History
HIST 205 Modern Mexican History
HIST 206 Colonial America
HIST 207 American Revolution
HIST 208 Women in American History
HIST 215 American Urban History
HIST 226 Colonial Latin America
HIST 227 African American History I: The Early Era
HIST 228 African American History II: The Modern Era
HIST 231 Modern Latin America
HIST 233 History of American Thought to 1865
HIST 234 History of American Thought from 1865 to Present
HIST 237 Europe Since the War
HIST 238 The World Wars in Global Perspective
HIST 240 Immigration and Ethnicity in America
HIST 243 US Legal and Constitutional History to 1865
HIST 244 US Legal and Constitutional History since 1865
HIST 246 American Environmental History
HIST 250 Medieval Popular Culture
HIST 253 Renaissance and Reformation
HIST 256 Technology and Society in Europe
HIST 260 Modernity in Russia
HIST 261 20th Century Russia
HIST 263 The Russian Land
HIST 264 Modern European City
HIST 272 Nazi Germany
HIST 276 The Age of Dictators
HIST 283 South Africa in Transition
HIST 284 Africa: From Colonialism to Neocolonialism
HIST 285 The Middle East: Roots of Conflict
HIST 286 Plants and Empire
HIST 292 Japan Before 1868
HIST 298 Exploring Modern China

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – ART HISTORY
ARTH 100 Issues in Art This course takes a broad view of the visual arts, discussing them not in isolation but in the context of the contemporary thought and culture of which they form a part. The course focuses on the social, political, and economic issues raised by the art of our time. Issues discussed include: race, gender, class, censorship, patronage, ecology, activism, etc. Students look at a selection of works from the field of fine art, that is, the practices of painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, installation, performance, video and other mixed media as a basis for a discussion of the issues raised by contemporary art. Open to first-year students only. (Staff, offered occasionally)

ARTH 101 Ancient to Medieval Art This course offers a chronological study of principal monuments and developments in paintings, sculpture, and architectures from prehistoric to medieval times in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Islamic world. (Tinkler, offered annually)

ARTH 102 Renaissance to Modern This course is a chronological study of principal monuments and developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture from Renaissance Italy to contemporary America. (Leopardi, offered annually)

ARTH 103 Introduction to Asian Art This course presents a topical study of the arts and architecture of China, Japan, India, and (to a lesser extent) Korea and Southeast Asia, with some comparisons to the arts of Central Asia, Europe, and America. We will examine developments in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, architecture, ceramics, prints, and installations, through a series of case studies. Broad topics will include connections between art, politics, philosophy, and religion; cross-cultural interactions of Asian cultures; artistic practice, patronage, and collecting; and international art movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. In addition, students will learn to analyze two- and three-dimensional works of art and architecture. There are no prerequisites, and no previous exposure to the arts of Asia is necessary. (Blanchard, offered annually)

ARTH 110 Visual Culture This course is an introduction to the history and concepts of art, architecture and visual culture. This course is offered in several sections by different art history professors with different areas of specialization, ranging from modern and contemporary, to Renaissance, medieval, non-Western or architectural. (Staff, offered occasionally)

ARTH 201 African American Art This course offers an exploration of the contributions of Black artists to American art, from the transplanting of African artisan traditions in the early 19th century to the fight for academic acceptance after the Civil War, from the evolution of a Black aesthetic in the 1920s to the molding of modernism into an expressive vehicle for the civil rights and Black pride movement of recent decades. Special attention paid to the Harlem Renaissance. Artists include Edmondia Lewis, Henry Tanner, Aaron Douglas, Jacob Lawrence, Faith Ringgold. (Staff, offered occasionally)

ARTH 202 Art Internship: Catalog This internship involves choosing and researching pieces in the Colleges' permanent collection of art and developing components research components necessary for adequate publication of those art works. Interns will be involved in documenting, conserving, and researching these works of art over the course of a term. The term will result in writing a catalog of these works for the spring exhibition from the collection. This is a half-credit course. (K. Vaughn, offered every Fall)

ARTH 203 Art Internship Exhibition This internship involves studying chosen pieces from the Colleges' permanent collection of art and developing components necessary for adequate exhibition of those art works. Interns will be involved in designing the exhibition from hanging to labeling over the course of the term. The term will result in an exhibition of these works from the collection. This is a half credit course. (K. Vaughn, offered every Spring)

ARTH 204 Art Internship: Acquisition This internship involves choosing a section of the Colleges permanent collection of art and developing an analysis of its strengths and weaknesses providing a knowledge base necessary to make acquisition decisions. Interns will develop an overview of the period of art chosen and compare it to our collection over the course of a term. The term will be used to identify and purchase a work which enhances the collection in the chosen section. This is a half credit course.  (K. Vaughn, offered every Fall)

ARTH 208 Greek Art and Architect This course surveys the art of the Greeks and Romans from the historical origins to the middle imperial period (ca. A.D. 200). Students examine the Greek pursuit of naturalism and their turn to emotion in art. Students contrast Greek use of ideal human form with the Roman interest in the depiction of individuals. In architecture, students study the classic expressions of Greco-Roman architecture in their stylistic unity and variety, especially in the way the buildings serve different functions with a limited language of building parts. Prerequisite: previous art history or classics course or permission of instructor. (Tinkler, offered alternate years)

ARTH 221 Italian Renaissance This course is an exploration of the extraordinary flowering of the arts in 14th and 15th century Florence. Artists include Giotto, Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, and Leonardo. The course considers the development of individual styles, the functions of art, the culture of humanism, and the dynamics of patronage. (Leopardi, offered occasionally)

ARTH 237 Princely Art This course will focus on the Renaissance Court Culture of the cities of Milan, Mantua, Ferrara and Rome. The course is meant to examine art production within the strict confines noble patronage by Italian princes. Particular attention will be paid to female patronage of Italian duchesses. All media will be taken under consideration – painting, sculpture and architecture – while paying particular attention to the ways in which artists responded to their patrons and introduced innovations eventually imitated by the merchant middle classes throughout the Italian peninsula. (Leopardi, offered alternate years)

ARTH 248 Love and Death in Ancient Egypt This course explores Egyptian paintings and reliefs from temples and tombs to reveal the strong sensual qualities encoded in the symbolism and iconography of funerary art.  A careful analysis of artifacts will helps us understand how encoded images were seen as a form of power and a means to obtain immortality.  While the course will provide a chronological survey of Egyptian art, it will mostly focus on the New Kingdom period because most of the tomb wall paintings to have survived belong to that specific period. (Leopardi, offered alternate years)

ARTH 250 Modern Art 1900-1960 A study of the avant-garde movements in art from the beginning of the 20th century through 1960. The artistic movements during this period occur in Italy, Germany, France Holland, Russia, and the USA. We will first define the avant-garde as an attempt to affect social change, and then look at its various manifestations including Fauvism, Dada, Cubism, German Expressionism, Russia Constructivism, Abstraction, Surrealism, New Realism, and American Abstract Expressionism. All of these avant-gardes express and define Modernism in art. We will therefore also define Modernism. Finally, we will study the potential ability of each movement to make social change. (Staff, offered alternate years)

ARTH 252 Japanese Art and Culture This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the arts and culture of Japan from the Neolithic period through the twentieth century. Students consider examples of visual media in the context of Japanese literature, history, society, and religions. Topics include Shinto architecture, Buddhist art (including Pure Land and Zen), narrative picture scrolls, traditional and western-style paintings, shoin architecture, gardens, tea ceremony ceramics and ukiyo-e prints (“pictures of the floating world”). Students read primary sources in translation, including Shinto myths, Buddhist texts, and selections from literature. Prerequisite: previous art history or Asian studies course. (Blanchard, offered alternate years)

ARTH 253 Buddhist Art and Architecture This course will examine Buddhist architecture, painting, and sculpture from South Asia, Southeast Asia, The Silk Road, and East Asia. We will consider five important movements in Buddhist practice: Theravada, Mahayana, Pure Land, Esoteric, and Zen. Topics will include images of the life of the historic Buddha and tales of his previous lives; the role of the stupa on Buddhist worship; the expansion of the Buddhist pantheon; associations between art and patronage; representations of multiple realms of existence; the development of the mandala; the role of mediation in artistic practice. When appropriate, students will read Buddhist texts in translation. (Blanchard, offered alternate years)

ARTH 254 Islamic Crossroads This course examines the artistic production of Islamic culture in the Western Mediterranean throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance by taking into account cross-cultural exchanges.  Themes under consideration will include: the relationship between art and literature; the rise of court culture; women's role in Islamic art, and Venice and Islam. (Leopardi, offered occasionally)

ARTH 272 Later Chinese Pictures This course will explore pictorial practice from the reestablishment of Chinese rule in 1368 through the end of the twentieth century, focusing on painting and printmaking.  Painting is regarded as high art in the earliest Chinese histories of art, second only to calligraphy, while prints are a much more common art form.  Material will be presented chronologically, but broader topics will include popular subject matter in later pictures, including figural topics and landscapes; art criticism and later theories on painting; notions of artist's places within specific social classes; questions of patronage and collecting; and Chinese responses to international art movements. (Blanchard, offered alternate years)

ARTH 282 20th Century American Art This course is a study of American art from the turn of the century to its ascendancy as the center of international art. (Staff, offered occasionally)

ARTH 305 Renaissance Women and Men It was once assumed that men and women enjoyed perfect equality in the Renaissance and that the beautiful representations of Venus and the Virgin Mary in Renaissance art signaled the esteem in which women were held. Recent research suggests otherwise, finding instead increasing subordination of women. This course explores this question by considering the interrelationships between images of women in Renaissance painting, social realities of women’s actual lives, the phenomenon of successful women artists, church dogma about women, and the period's literature by, for, and about women. It focuses primarily, but not exclusively, on Italy in the 15th and 16th centuries. Prerequisite: one course in either art history or women's studies or permission of the instructor. (Leopardi, offered occasionally)

ARTH 306/406 Telling Tales: Narrative Art Asia The relationship between text and image assumes primary significance in the arts of Asia. Of especial import is the use of visual narrative, or the art of storytelling. This course traces the role of narrative in the architecture, sculptures, and paintings of India, central Asia, China, and Japan. The course is designed as a series of case studies, through which students examine the special visual formats developed in Asia to facilitate the telling of tales and the specific religious, political, and cultural contexts in which narrative is deployed. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (Blanchard, offered occasionally)

ARTH 333/433 Art Since 1960 This course focuses on the art of the 1960s to the present day. The course includes movements such as Conceptual Art, Minimalism, Pop Art, Color Field Painting, New Image Painting, Neo Expressionism, and Post Modernism. The approach is topical and thematic, drawing upon works of art in various media including: video, film, performance, earthworks, site-specific sculpture, installation, etc. Individual works of art are discussed in the context of the theoretical writing informing their production. (Staff, offered occasionally)

ARTH 405 Renaissance Women and Men It was once assumed that men and women enjoyed perfect equality in the Renaissance and that the beautiful representations of Venus and the Virgin Mary in Renaissance art signaled the esteem in which women were held. Recent research suggests otherwise, finding instead increasing subordination of women. This course explores this question by considering the interrelationships between images of women in Renaissance painting, social realities of women's actual lives, the phenomenon of successful women artists, church dogma about women, and the period's literature by, for, and about women. It focuses primarily, but not exclusively, on Italy in the 15th and 16th centuries. Prerequisite: one course in either art history or women's studies or permission of the instructor. (Leopardi, offered occasionally)

ARTH 450 Independent Study

ARTH 456 1/2 Credit Independent Study

ARTH 480 Seminar: Art of the Pilgrimage Roads This seminar explores the art and architecture surrounding one of the most important medieval journeys: the pilgrimage. Theories of pilgrimage are discussed, as well as the physical journey which medieval pilgrims took to Santiago de Compostela, Rome and Jerusalem. The bulk of the course focuses on the reliquary arts, architecture, and sculpture which the pilgrim experienced on his/her journey to these sacred places. (Tinkler, Spring, offered occasionally)

ARTH 495 Honors

ARTH 499 Internship

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – STUDIO ART
ARTS 105 Color and Composition A perceptual approach to the study of color interaction and compositional dynamics, students work through a carefully structured series of problems designed to reveal empirically the nature of color interaction and relatedness and the fundamentals of good visual composition. Projects range from narrowly focused color problems to ambitious, expressive compositional inventions. (Bogin, Ruth, Kaplan, offered each semester)

ARTS 114 Introduction to Sculpture A broad introduction to sculptural processes and principles. Traditional and experimental approaches to creative artistic expression in a variety of media are investigated including carving, clay modeling, casting and construction. Materials may include plaster, wood, clay, metal, and mixed media. The history of modern sculpture is incorporated into the course through readings and discussion, as well as image and video presentations. (Aub, offered annually)

ARTS 115 Three Dimensional Design An introduction to three-dimensional concepts, methods, and materials with an emphasis on design. Project assignments involve investigations of organization, structure, and creative problem solving. Materials generally used in the course include cardboard, wood, metals, fabric, and plexiglas. (Aub, Blankenship, D'Angelo, Mathews, offered each semester)

ARTS  125 Introduction to Drawing A basic course in visual organization and visual expression, students focus on drawing from observation and the relational use of visual elements to create compositional coherence, clear spatial dynamics, and visually articulate expression. Students experiment with a range of drawing materials and subject matter. (Aub, Bogin, Yi, Ruth, offered each semester)

ARTS 165 Introduction to Imaging An introduction to the methods, materials, and history of photography. Lectures involve camera usage, lighting, wet-darkroom skills, digital darkroom techniques, digital printing, and pictorial composition. Weekly lectures on the history of photographically based imaging from 1839 to the present will illuminate the profound influence such methods have on the way we perceive reality. Access to either a 35mm film SLR camera or a digital SRL camera is required. (Chin, Kaplan, offered each semester)

ARTS 166 Introduction to Video I An introduction to creating art with moving images using digital video cameras and nonlinear (digital) editing.  Students produce a group of short works, which are contextualized by viewing and discussion of historical and contemporary video works. Emphasis will be placed on creating conceptual works that engage artists and audience in a deeper understanding of current issues and human experience.  Additional techniques that may be used and discussed include stop-motion animation, sound, and installation. (Chin, Kaplan, offered each semester)

ARTS 203 Representational Painting A sequel to ART 105, this course focuses on the problems of painting from a source, including still life, figure, and landscape. Students works to reconcile the insistent presence of objects with the need to create pictorial lights, space and compositional and expressive coherence. Prerequisite ARTS 105. (Bogin, Ruth, offered alternate years)

ARTS 204 Abstract Painting A sequel to ARTS 105, this course focuses on the generation of an abstract pictorial vocabulary and on the investigation of a range of compositional and expressive possibilities for the pictorial use of that vocabulary. Prerequisite: ARTS 105. (Bogin, Ruth, offered alternate years)

ARTS 209 Watercolor Painting An exploration of the fundamentals of painting with translucent color media. Western and Eastern traditions, as well as more experimental approaches, are investigated. Use of Gouache (opaque watercolor) may also be explored. Subject matter involves still life, figure, and landscape with excursions to rural and urban settings. Prerequisite: ARTS 105. (Bogin, Yi, offered alternate years)

ARTS 214 Metal Sculpture This course explores metal as a creative sculptural medium. Processes and techniques of direct and indirect working methods will be taught which includes fabrication and casting.  During the fabrication portion of the course, the formal aspects of design will be investigated along with its execution in stock metal (rods, sheet, plate) and "found" (recycled) metal.  In the process of working with these materials, the class will discuss assemblage possibilities, Constructivism, and the broader context of metal as a product of industry and war as it applies Modernist and Postmodernist concerns.  By contrast, in the bronze casting portion of the course, we will explore the age old process of the "lost - wax" method as it has been practiced continuously from the ancients to contemporary times.

ARTS 225 Life Drawing A study of the formal dynamics and the expressive potential of figure drawing. Students explore a variety of wet and dry media. Prerequisite: a 100-level studio art course or permission of instructor. (Aub, Bogin, Ruth, offered annually)

ARTS 227 Advanced Drawing A course based on the premise that every drawing, even the most meticulously representational, is an invented assemblage of marks and forms. Drawing projects in this class will focus on the process of visual invention using both representational subjects and abstraction. We will explore ways of generating visual forms and visual relationships with an emphasis on the imaginative use of materials. Collage in various guises will be a regular part of the processes of invention in this course. Prerequisite: ARTS 125 (Bogin, Ruth, offered annually)

ARTS 245 Photo Screenprinting An introduction to the basic technology of photo screenprinting, which can use both photographic and drawn images. Equal attention is given to issues of color and composition. Prerequisite: ART 105 or ART 125. (Yi, offered alternate years)

ARTS 246 Intaglio Printing An exploration of the basic techniques of intaglio printing, including drypoint, etching, and aquatint. Equal attention is given to composition and the effective use of visual form. Prerequisite: ART 125. (Yi, Bogin, offered alternate years)

ARTS 248 Woodcut Printing An introduction to the fundamental processes of woodcut printmaking. Traditional and experimental techniques are investigated. Formal dynamics and visual expression are the most important emphases of this course. Prerequisite: ART 125. (Yi, offered alternate years)

ARTS 265 Intermediate Imaging This course expands on themes introduced in Introduction to Imaging (ARTS 165) with additional emphasis on the development of conceptual expression in photographic imagery. Attention will be given to refining technical skills, which may include intermediate topics in image editing, camera controls, photographic composition, darkroom skills and lighting. Students will continue to be challenged to expand their visual vocabulary through exposure to contemporary and historical works of art. Classes are geared to the creation of an open, yet critical environment that fosters each student's emerging visual sensibility.  Prerequisite: ARTS 165. (Chin, Kaplan, offered annually)

ARTS 305 Painting Workshop For advanced students, the focus of this workshop is on the generation and development of individual painting ideas. Emphasis is on the creation of a process of painting that draws on a multitude of sources, inspirations, influences, and ideas and the way that work emerges from this matrix of pictorial possibilities. Students will study both Modernist and Postmodern approaches to image making through painting. Prerequisite: ARTS 203, ARTS 204, ARTS 209, or permission of the instructor. (Bogin, Ruth, offered annually)

ARTS 345 Printmaking Workshop This workshop is for students who have taken ARTS 245, ARTS 246, or ARTS 248. It is designed to enable students to do more advanced work in a chosen area of printmaking as well as explore new related areas of printmaking. Prerequisite: ARTS 245, ARTS 246, or ARTS 248. (Yi, offered alternate years)

ARTS 365 Imaging Workshop This is a concept based course in which the student is encouraged to employ a variety of imaging media to fully explore their creative potential in a workshop environment. Projects using large and medium format film cameras, alternative processes and digital image capture and output are required. Students may expand their exploration into more conceptual, process-oriented, video or web-based art. Prerequisite: ARTS 265 or ARTS 268. (Chin, Kaplan, offered alternate years)

ARTS 450 Independent Study

ARTS 456 1/2 Credit Independent Study

ARTS 480 Studio Art Senior Seminar This course seeks to provide students with a grounding in studio art theory as it pertains to the origins of modernism, the advent of postmodernism, and the development of a wide array of contemporary studio art practices.  It will also provide specific skills training in aspects of professional practice important to studio artists, including such topics as documentation of artwork, exhibition strategies and techniques, development of a portfolio, the writing of artist statements, and the delivery of artist talks.

ARTS 495 Honors

ARTS 499 Internship

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES
Architectural History and Theory
ARCH 110 Introduction to Architectural Studies An introduction to architecture and design culture, this course introduces students to the aims, methods, and issues of the design and planning disciplines with architecture at the core of our studies. This course also encourages students to think, look, and read critically about designed objects, places, and spaces through drawing, although no prior experience with sketching is expected. With these tools, the student will have a basic understanding of design, and will be prepared to undertake more specialized study. The course will vary between giving students a survey of world architectural history and/or providing them with an awareness of issues facing designers at the dawn of the twenty-first century including sustainability, social responsibility, and the democratization of design. (S. Mathews, Makker, Blankenship, offered annually)

ARCH 310 Early Modern Architecture This course traces the major tendencies of European and American architecture from the Enlightenment to World War One.  In this course, we examine the roots of modern architecture in relation to culture and society.  In particular, we will look at how developments in architecture relates to developments in other disciplines such as art, science, philosophy and politics. Prerequisite: ARCH 110. (S. Mathews, offered annually)

ARCH 313 History of Modern Landscape Architecture This course presents a survey of landscape design from the 19th century to the present with an emphasis on the 20th century. Lectures, readings, and discussion will present and analyze specific parks, gardens, roads, planned communities, and other sites of invention. Works of landscape design will be physically contextualized through consideration of contemporary and allied humanities, especially philosophy, literature, painting, and architecture. The relationship of individual landscape projects to their topographic and social contexts will emerge as a central theme of the course. Students will learn to see, analyze, and appreciate works of landscape design, and also the historical trends and cultural forces that have shaped them. (Blankenship, offered alternate years)

ARCH 412 Social Construction of Space Space is a physical manifestation of culture and must therefore be understood as both a physical form and a social practice.  This course will provide the opportunity to understand some of the cultural forces that create space, and the ways in which space becomes a social force that profoundly affects identity.  This is a class that primarily examines socio-spatial relationships in the context of the United States, especially the ways in which space is used in the U. S. to designate and reinforce class, race, gender and sexuality.  The course will begin with an introduction to spatial theory and spatial issues on an abstract and large-scale level as underpinnings for the more detailed examinations of these issues in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, community formation, and the daily activities of individuals in public and private spaces. (Makker, offered alternate years)

ARCH 450 Independent Study

ARCH 456 1/2 Credit Independent Study

ARCH 495 Honors

ARCH 499 Internship

Architecture Design Studios
ARCS 200 Introduction to Architectural Design I: Spatial This course is an introduction to architectural composition emphasizing conceptual thinking. The design projects stress concept development and rigorous design process in order to create rich and evocative experiences and architectural elements. We will explore the artistic, conceptual, poetic, and experiential side of architecture as a way of developing a rigorous process of architectural form-making. This studio is about object-making at both small and large scales (book-sized to furniture-sized to house-sized) without reference to a specific site or context. This course emphasizes free-hand drawing in both pen and pencil, working in watercolor and colored pencil, and building models with clipboard and foam core. Students will learn how to sketch ideas as two-dimensional diagrams and as three-dimensional perspectives. Readings and other materials: Ching, Frank, Architecture: Form, Space, Order; Frederick, 101 Things I Learned in Architecture School. Prerequisites: ARCH 110 and ART 115 and ART 125. (Makker, Blankenship, D'Angelo, offered each semester)

ARCS 300 Introduction to Architectural Design II: Material Craft + Poetics This course is an introduction to architectural composition emphasizing form making that is aesthetic, imaginative and suitable for everyday use by humans.  The design projects stress craft and attention to detail, appropriateness within an architectural context, and fluidity of design concept at multiple scales (for example, a decision about texture affects decisions about massing affects decisions about siting).  We will explore the material, technical, structural, and crafted qualities of architectural elements.  This studio is about object-making at both small and large scales (book-sized to furniture-sized to room-sized) with reference to a specific site or context or utility. This course emphasizes drafting drawing in both pen and pencil, working in watercolor and colored pencil, and building models with chipboard and wood.  Students will learn how to draw plans, sections, elevations, and three-dimensional axonometric representations. (Blankenship, Makker, D'Angelo, offered each semester)

ARCS 303 Visual Notes and Analysis A necessary part of design education is learning to observe, to document and to analyze our perceptions of architectural form and space through drawing diagrammatically rather than purely illustratively. Like a writer interprets and analyzes what they learn when they read or are lectured to, a designer uses diagrams to dissect the built works of architecture, interiors, and landscape and urban design they see in order to better understand the underlying principles that govern the physical disposition of elements, spaces, and their use. Learning to see involves both abstraction and generalization; learning to record involves understanding a conventional drawing vocabulary; learning to analyze involves understanding design principles and paradigms. We will work on location in the area, recording our visual observations only using the eye and our foot pace to measure and record spaces. No mechanical means (tape measure, ruler, camera) will be used. This course will introduce students to the habit of keeping a designer's sketchbook and to the skills used for documenting and analyzing the built environment through diagrammatic drawing in contrast to the fine arts tradition of illustrative drawing. Readings and other materials: Ching, Frank, Architecture: Form, Space, Order; Ching, Frank, Design Drawing; Cooper, Drawing and Perceiving. Prerequisites:  ARCH 110 AND two of the following:  ARTS 115, ARTS 114, ARTS 125 (Makker, Mathews, offered alternate years)

ARCS 400 Advanced Architecture Studio This advanced studio design course offers students an opportunity to engage in a design project at an upper level, both in terms of skills/abilities and intellectually in terms of tackling complex circumstances, site or program constraints or questions. The physical site may be in an urban, exurban, rural or small town context where the design project must participate in a wide matrix of formal, cultural and environmental references. Research, through analysis of precedent, site investigation, critical readings and exploration of technique, is considered a creative activity, driven by hypothesis and providing the base for much of the production in the studio.  Prerequisites: Two ARCS studios at the 200 or 300-level; architectural, art, or landscape history courses; or permission of the instructor. (Makker, Blankenship, D'Angelo, Spring, offered occasionally)

ARCS 405 Senior Seminar: Architectural Portfolio The Architectural Portfolio course provides senior Architecture Studies majors with capstone experience. At the end of this course, each student will have a professional quality graphic record of their design work at the Colleges in the form of a graphic narrative of their creative process. Students learn the special techniques of photographing architectural drawings and models, how to use Adobe Photoshop and how to manipulate, edit, and correct digital images. The course then explores graphic design and how to present a graphic narrative of design. Finally, students will learn the fine points of professional printing and binding. By the end of the course, students will have a high-quality portfolio, essential for admission to any graduate architecture program. Prerequisites: Must be a senior Architectural Studies Major. (S. Mathews, Makker, Blankenship, D'Angelo, offered annually)

ARCS 450 Independent Study

ARCS 456 1/2 Credit Independent Study

ARCS 495 Honors

ARCS 499 Internship

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