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German Language and Culture House

German House

The purpose of this house is to raise awareness of German language and culture through various on campus events and to create a community where students of German and international students from Germany can feel at home and learn from one another.

Home to 7 students, the house has a full kitchen and tv room. Laundry facilities can be accessed in Sherrill Hall. Each room is equipped with full telephone, cable and Internet access.

Residence Requirements:

Residents must exhibit an interest in German Culture (through academic courses or involvement in the German House events) and be in good academic and social standing.

More Information:

Meal Option: Co-op
Room Types: 7 Singles
Window Treatment: Pull-down Shades (white)
Bed style: Standard twin. Students over 6'3" may request extra long beds.

 

Events

German Film Series - Fall 2012

Presented by the German Studies Department. All films are in German and have English subtitles.

All Films: 6 p.m., Intercultural Affairs (288 Pulteney Street)

Nowhere in Africa (2001)
September 26
Director: Caroline Link

In 1938, the Redlich family flees to Kenya from Nazi Germany to escape the increasing persecution of the Jews. Walter, a former lawyer, finds work as a farm manager and sends for his family. His wife Jettel has trouble adjusting to life in Africa, although their daughter Regina quickly adapts to her new environment, easily learning the language of the country and showing interest in local culture. When war breaks out, the British round up all German citizens, and hold them, whether Jew or gentile, separating men from women. Walter decides to join the British army and wants Jettel to go to Nairobi with him, but she refuses and stays to run the farm. Regina is sent to an English boarding school, and is kept there for years, only being able to come back every so often during the harvest season. When the war ends, Walter decides to return to Germany. Will his family join him?

When We Leave (2010)
November 28
Director: Feo Aladag

Umay, a young woman of Turkish-German descent, flees her oppressive marriage in Istanbul, taking her young son Cem with her. She hopes to find a better life with her family in Berlin, but her unexpected arrival creates intense conflict. Her family is trapped in their conventions, torn between their love for her and the traditional values of their community. Ultimately they decide to return Cem to his father in Turkey. To keep her son, Umay is forced to move again. She finds the inner strength to build a new life for herself and Cem, but her need for her family’s love drives her to a series of ill-fated attempts at reconciliation. What Umay doesn’t realize is just how deep the wounds have gone and how danger ous her struggle for self-determination has become.

The Lives of Others (2006)
October 31
Director: Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck

The film is set in the East Germany of 1984, five years before the Berlin Wall collapsed. It was a time when the terrifying Stasi, the secret police in the GDR, made it their business to use an extensive network of spies and surveillance to know everything about their citizens. Unlike other German films, most notably the landmark Goodbye, Lenin!, The Lives of Others is hardly an exercise in what is called “Ostalgia”: nostalgia for the good old days of the East. Instead, it is an inside look at how a surveillance society, set up to discover and prey upon human weakness, has the ability to make everyone a potential suspect and destroy everything it touches.

 

Get Involved

Stammtisch is the German conversation table, which meets Mondays from 12:00 p.m.- 1:00 p.m. in the cafe in Scandling Campus Center.

 

The International Student Association is a student-run organization that may be of interest to students studying German.

For more information about these organizations or to learn about starting your own economics-themed club, contact Cully Semans (semans@hws.edu) in the Office of Student Activities.