Loading
graphic

Individual Major

dance

Movement Science is the most popular Individual Major that students declare. In recent years, however, students with interests in dance and dance-related studies have also declared Individual Majors in "Art and Social Change," "Communications Through the Arts" "Mind, Body, and Performance," to name a few.

The Movement Science major focuses on the human body and human movement from an interdisciplinary perspective and examines the laws of movement, the psychology of human movement, the makeup of the human body, movement analysis and movement development.

Students pursuing this major generally have career interests in Physical Therapy, Sports Medicine, Athletic Training, Somatic Therapy, Athletic Coaching or Movement Education.


COURSE LIST

If you'd like to view a full listing of our course options in Dance or any other subject, please visit the Online Course Catalogue.

Click for the Course Catalogue

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Requirements for the Individual Major in Movement Science (B.A.)

interdisciplinary

Core Courses
DAN 305: Somatics
DAN 325: Movement Analysis
DAN 225: Anatomy and Kinesiology

Typically, the major also includes core coursework in the Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, and Education departments. Examples of courses include:

BIO 324: Anatomy
BIO 233: Physiology
CHEM 240: Organic Chemistry I
PHYS 150 and/or 160: Physics I and II
PSY 203: Child Psychology
PSY 299: Sensation and Perception
PSY 231: Biopsychology
EDUC 202: Human Growth and Development

Students with a Movement Science Major have also taken courses in other Departments/Programs, such as:

ANTH 341: Seminar: Making Babies: Anthropology of Reproductive Technologies
PHIL 156: Biomedical Ethics
REL 306: The Perfectible Body
WMST 220: Body Politic
WMST 305: Food, Feminism and Health
WMST 204: Politics of Health
Relevant courses taken during study abroad tours

Introductory Courses for the major: Only one introductory course may be counted toward the major (see Individual Major Guidelines). Students interested in pursuing a Movement Science major are therefore advised to complete Introductory courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, and other relevant departments within the first two years of college.

Current Movement Studies/Movement Science Majors:
Morgan Atanasio '14
Molly Breen '14 (Exercise Science)
Emily D’Addario '13 (Health Sciences)
Chelsea Dunay '14 (Health Sciences)
Sheridan French '14
James McHenry '14
Danielle Moreau '14
Jacqueline Murphy '14

 

COURSES

Our students choose from a variety of introductory and advanced courses, each designed to provide students with a solid foundation in the technical, theoretical and historical aspects of dance.

Below, you'll find a sampling of some of our most popular classes, as well as suggestions for making Dance a part of your larger interdisciplinary experience at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

DAN 225 Anatomy and Kinesiology

Class

If you're interested in physical therapy, athletic training, physical education or human biology, in this course you will study principles of alignment, conditioning and injury prevention, while you gain knowledge of human skeletal anatomy and muscular anatomy. Build on your knowledge of the systems of the body by enrolling in BIO 224, Functional Vertebrate Anatomy, where you will study how the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory and nervous systems are affected by various vertebrates and how anatomic structures function.

DAN 305 Somatics

Class

Learn about our psychological awareness of our bodies by studying the art and science of the interrelational process between awareness, biological function and environment. Examine the psychological processes involved in interpreting sensory input in PSY 299 Sensation and Perception, explore how people experience and understand the world through the senses.

DAN 325 Movement Analysis

Class

Discover the theories and application of Laban Movement Analysis, which applies directly to all physical actions of the human body. Learn how to observe, record, describe and notate subtle qualities in movement. Further develop your understanding of human movement by enrollin in DAN 215 Movement for Athletes: Analysis and Peformance, and study concepts of coordination, alignment and efficient body functioning that are inherent in all sports.