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CAREER AND COLLEGE READY

We know that a college graduate earns double what one might earn without a high school diploma. We also know that educational attainment past high school leads to longer and healthier lives with an enhanced quality of life. Equally important in encouraging students to pursue education after high school is helping them to investigate and prepare for career opportunities should that be their immediate path. This information will prove invaluable to build upon existing programs that engage Geneva High School alumni who have excelled in college as well as to enhance opportunities to support students who may opt to immediately pursue job prospects after graduation.

Our goal is to expand Geneva High School alumni outreach efforts to determine higher education and career pathways, and provide role models for students.

Cited: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In its report titled "Building Blocks for Change: What it Means to be Career Ready," the Career Readiness Partner Council defines career and college readiness as the following:

"For too many years, high school graduates throughout the United States faced a fork in the road. One path led to a four-year college, the other to an entry-level job. Some students chose for themselves, while others were tracked based on aptitude and, all too often, on race and income. In today’s 21st century global economy, the choices are much more complex and interconnected, and the fork in the road has been replaced by numerous paths, all of which require a rigorous and rich high school experience that prepares all students—not just some—for college and a career."

Additional Information

"Our Challenge: Graduating Students College and Career Ready" by John B. King, Jr., a presentation given in June, 2012 at EngageNY

The American Diploma Project Network

Achieve launched the American Diploma Project (ADP) Network in 2005, with the goal of making college and career readiness a priority within the United States. An annual report, Closing the Expectations Gap, is published yearly depicting states’ progression toward the alignment of high school standards, graduation requirements, and assessment and accountability systems with the demands of college and careers. To learn more, visit the Achieve and the American Diploma Project Network website.

Pathways to College Network

The Institute of Higher Education Policy (IHEP), a Washington, D.C., nonprofit organization, launched the Pathways to College Network in 2001. The Network is a national organization promoting partnership and collaboration among community, education institutions and leaders, and policymakers with an emphasis on evidence-based policies and practices for alignment across middle school, high school, and higher education. The organization’s overarching goal is to improve college accessibly, and post-secondary success of undeserved students, including first generation college students, minorities, students with disabilities, and low-income students. Pathways promotes the use of research-based policies and practices, the development of new research that is both rigorous and actionable, and the alignment of efforts across middle school, high school, and higher education in order to promote college access and success for underserved students. Visit the Pathways to College Network website for more information.

Contact

To learn more about Geneva 2020, contact:
Katie Flowers
Director of the Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning
Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Geneva, NY 14456
(315) 781-3825
Geneva2020@hws.edu


Contribute

To make a donation to Geneva 2020, please complete the donation form. All checks should be made out to the GCSD with "Geneva 2020" in the memo.

Fill out the Commitment Form to indicate an area of interest within the Geneva 2020 model. That interest could match one or more of the projects outlined on the Geneva 2020 Priorities list, or it could indicate a general range of expertise that could be of use to the Geneva City School District.