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ENG 213 Archives Project at the Geneva Historical Society

"160 Years of Public Ambiguity: Inquiring into the Reception History of
Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, Social and Medical Pioneer"

Annotated Bibliography

Anonymous. Gwendolyn Grant Mellon. [Award Ceremony Program]. Geneva: Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1959.
     An event brochure, which includes the biography of the first recipient of the Elizabeth Blackwell Award, Gwendolyn Grant Mellon.  Mellon was admired for establishing the Albert Schweizer hospital in Haiti with her husband. (Bernadette and Abi)

Anonymous. Presentation of Marty Mann for the Sixth Elizabeth Blackwell Award. [Award Ceremony Program]. Geneva: Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1963.
  An event brochure which includes the biography of the sixth recipient of the Elizabeth Blackwell Award, Marty Mann. Mann was recognized for being the founder of the National Council on Alcoholism. (Bernadette and Abi)

Anonymous. Presentation of the Ninth Elizabeth Blackwell Award. [Award Ceremony Program]. Geneva: Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1966.
   An event brochure which focuses on the year the Elizabeth Blackwell Award was first established in 1958; Merle Gulick is mentioned as the first presenter of the award. (Bernadette and Abi)

"Antoinette Brown Blackwell: Biography of Western NY Suffragists." 2000. Rochester Regional
Library Council. 13 Mar 2003. http://winningthevote.org/ABBlackwell.html.
   A small entry detailing her accomplishments as the first female minister in America. (Melissa and Kendall)

Blackwell, Elizabeth. The Laws of Life. Colville, WA: The Statesman Examiner, 1989.
  A reprint of Blackwell's original book comprised of six lectures. Includes extensive introduction. (Grace and Nell)

Blackwell, Elizabeth. Letter to Ezra Cornell.  April 7, 1865. (Aubrie & Isabella)

Blackwell, Elizabeth. Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women. New York: Humanity Books, 2005. Print.
  This is a personally written, first-person account of Elizabeth Blackwell's life through the use of letters, journal entries, and other forms of information sharing.  It includes all time periods of her life and her journey from before becoming a medical doctor to her experiences post-graduation. (Megan and Elizabeth)

Brown, Jordan. Elizabeth Blackwell, American Woman of Achievement. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1989.
  An extensive reference text on Blackwell's life from the time she was born to her death and furthermore how even after her death, and to this day, she is still making an impact on the lives of women and is known for beating adversities. (Tairmae and Alyssa)

Conroy, Gertrude F. "American Medical Women's Association Inc." Letter. 16 Sept. 1966.
         A letter stating the first award associated with Elizabeth Blackwell was given in 1949 to eighteen members of the American Women's Medical Association, before Hobart and William Smith Colleges implemented the Elizabeth Blackwell Award. (Bernadette and Abi)

Craddock Jr., Samuel.  Letter to Miss D. E. Craddock. October 9, 1847. (Aubrie & Isabella)

Craddock Jr., Samuel.  Letter to Miss D. E. Craddock. October 25, 1847. (Aubrie & Isabella)

DeLancey, Margaret Munro.  Letter to Joe.  January 29, 1849. (Aubrie, Isabella)

"Dr Harding receives award at Blackwell Day ceremonies." The Pulteney St. Survey. Jan. 1974. (Alyssa and Laura)

"Elizabeth Blackwell: Biography of Western NY Suffragists." 2000. Rochester Regional Library
Council. 13 Mar 2003. http://winningthevote.org/EBlackwell.html.
  A longer entry detailing her accomplishments as the first female physician in America. (Melissa and Kendall)

"Emily Blackwell." National Women's Hall of Fame. 13 Mar 2003. http://www.greatwomen.org/profile.php?id=21. (Melissa and Kendall)
  An entry detailing her accomplishments as director of a women's college and hospital.

First Presbyterian Church. "First Day of Issue Ceremonies Honoring ELIZABETH BLACKWELL" [Program]. Geneva, N.Y. 23 January 1974.

"French Editor Receives Eighth Blackwell Award At Commencement." The Geneva Times. 14 June 1965. 
  A newspaper article which includes a small biography concerning the eighth recipient of the
Elizabeth Blackwell Award, Annette LeMeitour-Kaplun. She was admired for being an editor of the International Journal of Health Education.  (Bernadette and Abi)

Fenalson, Laurie. "Blackwell in Residence: A Legacy Reborn." Pulteney Street Survey. Fall 1994, Volume XII: 4-6.
  This article, which was originally published in a 1994 Hobart College publication, primarily discusses the erection of the Elizabeth Blackwell statue that is presently displayed on the southwest corner of the quad. It includes a brief summary of Elizabeth Blackwell's life and work, as well as interviews with the Dean of Faculty and Provost, Sheila Bennett, and the artist who sculpted the statue, Professor Ted Aub.

"Geneva Medical College Commencement." Geneva Gazette. Friday, 26 Jan, 1849: page 2 (Aubrie & Isabella)

Hart, Richard. "Elizabeth Blackwell in Geneva" [Sermon]. First Presbyterian Church, Geneva, NY. 23 January 1974. (Laura and Alyssa)

Hersh, Richard. Letter to Ms. Eleanore Clise, 25 August 1994. (Laura and Alyssa)

"Hobart Awarded Degree to First Woman Doctor."  Syracuse Journal (20 March 1939): (Pages missing)
   Newspaper article giving a brief overview of Blackwell's life and how she came to graduate as the first female medical doctor.  The article emphasizes her refusal by other medical schools, being snubbed by women, and her fight against the spread of typhoid fever. (Megan and Elizabeth)

Imbornoni, Ann-Marie. "Timeline of Key Events in the American Women's Rights Movement." 2007. www.infoplease.com/spot/womenstimeline1.html#1961. 26 October 2009.

Johnston, Malcolm Sanders. Elizabeth Blackwell and Her Alma Mater: "The Story in the Documents."
Geneva, NY: WF Humphrey Press Inc., 1947.

"Junior Editors' Quiz on Elizabeth Blackwell."  (Other information for citation is missing).
   Newspaper article posing the question "who is Elizabeth Blackwell?" to a younger audience.  A response was sent in by a child, who gave a brief biography of Blackwell.  Included was a cartoon of Blackwell to entice a younger audience to read about her. (Megan and Elizabeth)

Lamond, Thom. "Dr Blackwell Inspired Women." The Geneva Times. Jan. 1974.

The Laws of Life. Advertisement and order form. Northport, WA: Unspecified Publisher, 1988. 
  A brochure advertising the reprint of Blackwell's The Laws of Life. (Grace and Nell)

Lewis, Jone Johnson. "A Soul as Free as the Air: A Profile of Lucy Stone." 16 Mar 2000. The
History Net. 13 Mar 2003. http://womenshistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa062899.htm.
   An entry detailing Stone's accomplishments as the first woman to retain her maiden name. (Melissa and Kendall)

"Lucy Stone." National Women's Hall of Fame. 13 Mar 2003. http://www.greatwomen.org/profile.php?id=153.
  An article detailing the difficulties Lucy encountered using her maiden name while married. (Melissa and Kendall)

Nader, Jan. Elizabeth Blackwell. Mankato, MN: Capstone Press, 2007.
   A children's book outlining the significant events in Blackwell's life. It chronicles her years and includes photographs and portraits depicting Blackwell's years spent working towards her numerous goals as a woman and doctor. Interestingly, the book completely leaves out Blackwell's years spent doing practical work in Europe after graduating from medical school.

Nagle, Jeanne M. "A Return to England." Cobblestone (1 March 2003): page numbers missing.
   This article summarizes Elizabeth Blackwell's time in England after completing her "pioneer work" as female doctor in the States. At the time of her arrival in England (1869) the idea of a female doctor was not widely accepted. Blackwell pushes on to establish a hospital and a medical school for women while also playing a part in the women's rights movement and advocating the necessity of sexual education for children.

Photograph of Elizabeth Blackwell: The Schlesinger Library, The Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University. In: Somerville, Barbara A. Elizabeth Blackwell: America's First Female Doctor.
Pleasantville, NY: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2009.
  A photograph of a young Elizabeth Blackwell. (Melissa and Kendall)

Scalpel and Tongs. "Free Offer: Elizabeth Blackwell cachet and special February issue of Scalpel and Tongs." Journal of Medical Philately. University of Pennsylvania Medical School. 1974. (Laura and Alyssa)

Smith, Dean.  "A Persistent Rebel."  American History Illustrated.  January, 1981.
   Dean Smith's publication discusses the struggles Elizabeth Blackwell went through on her journey to becoming a doctor.  It focuses on the years surrounding her entrance to medical school and her achievements as a female doctor as well as the troubles she faced after her graduation from Geneva Medical College. (Tairmae and Alyssa)

Somerville, Barbara A. Elizabeth Blackwell: America's First Female Doctor. Pleasantville, NY:
Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2009.
   A publication detailing the life and medical accomplishments of Dr. Blackwell. (Melissa and Kendall)

United States Postal Service. Announcement of Commemorative Stamp.18-cent Elizabeth Blackwell Regular Postage Stamp. Stamp. 23 January 1974. (Laura and Alyssa)

Walsh, Dr. Mary Roth. Introduction. Opening the Medical Profession to Women. By Elizabeth Blackwell. New York: Schocken Books, 1977.
  Dr. Mary Roth Walsh is an associate professor at the University of Lowell, Massachusetts.  Her introduction of the 1977 reprint of Blackwell's book provides historical insight into Blackwell's life.

Whittier, Isabel.  Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell: The First Woman Doctor.  Brunswick, Maine: Brunswick Publishing Company, 1961.
  Isabel Whittier is a member of the History Department of Brooklyn College in New York.  Written in 1961, this short book gives a historical account of Blackwell's life and her impact on women in the medical profession during her time, as well as the impacts that remain today.

 

PROJECT INFO

ENG 213 Archives Project at the Geneva Historical Society: Elizabeth Blackwell

Assistant Professor of English Sarah Russo
Fall 2009

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